Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "immigration" ...

  • Breakdown: America's Immigration System

    Breakdown: America's Immigration System They flee the most dangerous places in North America, where murder rates are some of the highest in the world. Yet, when they come to the U.S., these immigrants encounter new hurdles created by an immigration system in total breakdown. NBC Bay Area’s Investigative Unit spent five years pulling back the curtain on system that is deeply flawed and completely overwhelmed. One judge likened it to life and death decisions being made with the same lack of resources as “traffic court.” As part of our commitment to covering this issue in a different way, NBC Bay Area sought to tell the story of immigrant policy in a way that most media do not.
  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • Zero Tolerance

    ProPublica published a secret recording from inside a border patrol detention center which captured the anguish of children separated from their parents and forced the Trump Administration to reverse its family separation policy, then dug deeply into conditions at detention centers where thousands of separated children and unaccompanied minors have been sent.
  • Trapped in Gangland

    The Central American gang MS-13 accounts for 1 percent of U.S. gang murders. But when Donald Trump became president, he seized on the gang’s violence on Long Island to promote tougher immigration policies. This series, co-published with New York magazine, Newsday, The New York Times Magazine and This American Life, showed how Trump’s bungled crackdown on MS-13 burned informants, deported young immigrants suspected of gang involvement on flimsy evidence, and failed to prevent further murders. Based on a year and a half of difficult and dangerous reporting, ProPublica reporter Hannah Dreier’s stories persuasively depicted how an entire subculture of Latino teenagers came to be trapped between the gang and the government.
  • Indian Hills Community College

    The Indian Hills Community College baseball team in Iowa ousted two of its coaches — one of them a hall of fame coach — in May. After a more than four-month investigation, the Daily Iowegian found the coaches were removed after an internal investigation that coaches forced players to work for security companies at NFL and Big 10 games in Minneapolis and Iowa City, all while assigning fake names to foreign-born students so they could work around federal immigration law. The money went to the baseball program, not the players.
  • Unsettling

    The federal government oversees a complex program to help refugees come to this country. But the effort does not always live up to promises, potentially making the path more difficult for refugees striving to adapt to their new homeland. Audits, financial filings and internal government reports indicate that a significant number of government-funded charities contracted to help the newcomers are misspending money, an NYCity News Service examination of hundreds of documents found. Promised services are delayed or never delivered, medical care is often postponed beyond guidelines and program oversight can lag. http://unsettling.nycitynewsservice.com/
  • Bordering on Insecurity

    The Texas Tribune's yearlong project, Bordering on Insecurity, dissected the dynamics of illegal immigration and enforcement, laid waste to political myths, and offered readers an intellectually honest understanding of the criminal activities that threaten the nation's southern border.
  • Border Patrol

    We believe this is the most extensive investigation on the U.S. border conducted by a Sunday news program in 2016. We begin by revealing one of the biggest issues that’s gotten lost in the debate over illegal immigration: the disturbing increase in drug smuggling. In Border Control, we find evidence that our southern border is not under U.S. control. In Tunnel Vision, we expose some of the underground tunnels that cartels have used to smuggle drugs and people into the U.S. In Bordertown, USA, we provide an unusual profile of a U.S. border town so influenced by illegal smugglers and drugs, that the culture has worked its way into the fabric of daily life: Douglas, Arizona. In Crossing the Line, we take an eye opening look at the corruption inside U.S. Customs and Border Protection. And in Cuban Exodus, we exclusively reveal the “mind-boggling” number of Cubans surging across the Mexican border into the U.S.