Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "journalist" ...

  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • The Washington Post: Murder with Impunity

    The Washington Post’s examination of unsolved murder in America began with a simple question: Where does justice for victims go unserved? To answer that, The Post produced ‘Murder with Impunity’ an investigative series, based on the reporting of a team of journalists that compiled case-level information for more than 50,000 homicides in 50 of the nation’s largest cities.
  • The Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • The Marshall Project: The Bail Bond Racket

    Many journalists have detailed the financial costs the bail bond industry imposes on poor or minority families. This article is the first to expose, in detail and to the penny, the financial benefits reaped by the bail bond industry, using the lightly regulated state of Mississippi as case in point.
  • The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi

    CNN was across the mysterious disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi with its Istanbul team the day the Saudi journalist vanished. As the mystery deepened and Saudi Arabia continued to insist that Khashoggi had left the consulate, CNN worked the story from Istanbul, Ankara, Riyadh, London and Washington. Crucially, CNN broke a number of stories in the developing mystery which shed light on what really happened and Saudi Arabia’s role.
  • Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • Swedish Radio: The Riding School

    In the nineties the riding instructor “Mårten” is convicted of sexual abuse of several pupils at his riding school. But other adults believe he is innocent, and despite the conviction, equestrian organizations allow Mårten and the riding school to continue. When Robert Barkman and Daniel Velasco start investigating the old case in 2017 Mårten is still having young pupils at the riding school. After months of investigations, some of the pupils starts speaking about what has happened there during the last decades. The documentary series The Riding School reveals how silence culture and denials arise, how power structures and betrayal from the adult world can lead to a person being able to continue abusing new pupils for decades, despite a conviction. The Riding School has had a big impact in Sweden and received Sweden's most prestigious journalist prizes.
  • Simon & Schuster: A Deal with the Devil

    A Deal with the Devil chronicles the journey of two investigative journalists as they search for answers about one of the longest-running mail frauds in history. The scam centers around a mysterious psychic named Maria Duval, whose name and face have become infamous to sick and elderly victims all around the world, who have sent in millions of dollars in response to bogus promises made by letters allegedly signed by Duval. Global investigators have spent decades trying to stop the fraud, but when those efforts failed and they couldn’t determine who this woman was -- or if she was even real – authors Blake Ellis and Melanie Hicken made it their mission to get to the bottom of this notorious scam once and for all. Their hunt takes readers on twists and turns as they discover key orchestrators of the fraud hiding away in places like Monaco and Thailand, and as they get farther than any law enforcement has -- even traveling to France in an attempt to confront the psychic herself. Investigative reporter Bethany McLean called the book “a personal how-to guide for investigative journalists, a twisted tale of a scam of huge proportions and a really good read.” NYU Journalism Professor Adam Penenberg, who famously exposed journalist fraudster Stephen Glass, said, “Journalists Ellis and Hicken out-sleuthed professional law enforcement in unraveling the mystery of a $200 million global scam. What they have wrought would have made a gripping novel. The fact that every word is true is what makes this book downright shocking.” Other endorsements came from NBC business anchor Ali Velshi and crime fiction writer Megan Abbott.
  • Racism in the Ranks

    The 2018 acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie reverberated across the country. Indigenous people rallied against what they saw as an injustice. “We knew we really went back 10 years, maybe fifteen years on all the work we’ve been trying to do in this province in this country on reconciliation.” – Darlene Okemaysim-Sicotte, Advocate for Indigenous women Stanley shot and killed Boushie after the 22-year-old Cree man and friends had driven on Stanley’s farm in rural Saskatchewan. In the midst of the debate over whether the not guilty verdict was a symptom of systemic racism or support of the right to defend property, APTN Investigates video journalist Trina Roache discovered racist posts by an RCMP (ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE) officer on social media.