Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "juveniles" ...

  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Juvenile Sexual Assaults Victims of Dr. William Ayres: The Forgotten Victims

    For forty years, hundreds of juveniles in San Mateo County, California were sexually assaulted in court-ordered sessions by prominent child psychiatrist Dr. William Ayres. But when the victims spoke out, they were either ignored or punished by authorities. It wasn’t until 2002, when journalist Victoria Balfour contacted police on behalf of one of Ayres’ victims, a private patient, that a criminal case against Ayres began to get traction. In 2013, Ayres, a former President of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, pleaded no contest to molesting boys who had been his private patients. He was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Balfour had a fierce belief that the voices of his juvenile victims urgently needed to be heard in this case as well. When agencies in San Mateo County whose job it was to protect juveniles rebuffed her request to find the juvenile victims, Balfour embarked on a 3 and-a-half year project to find them herself. Working on a detective's theory that most of Ayres' juvenile victims were now in prison, she wrote to more than 300 inmates from San Mateo County and asked if they had been evaluated by Ayres. Balfour’s article recounts the horrifying and heartbreaking responses she received from inmates about their abuse by Dr. Ayres, one of the most prolific child molesters in recent California history.
  • Mass. courts fail to shield juveniles in holding areas

    Since Sept. 2010, Massachusetts has been in violation of a federal law requiring courthouses to protect juveniles from being verbally abused or threatened by adult inmates in courthouse holding areas. This has resulted in annual penalties that slashed about $500,000 in grant money intended for at-risk youth and intervention programs in the Massachusetts juvenile justice system. It’s a problem that will cost $1.34 million to fix 11 “high priority” courts, as Massachusetts officials sought — and failed to receive — a waiver from those penalties from the Justice Department.
  • Juvenile Justice?

    Project examines the impact a prosecutor's power to send youth to adult courts without judicial review has on juvenile plea deals and the length of juvenile detentions.
  • Juvenile Justice?

    A seven-month investigation by the Times-Union found that prosecutors in the Jacksonville area used the threat of adult charges to force low-risk juvenile defendants to accept plea deals that would send them to facilities meant for the most hardened juveniles – even in cases where the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice said those juveniles shouldn't have been locked up at all.
  • How Kids Get Caught in Chicago's Deadly Gun Trap

    Told through the perspective of a killer out on parole, this is the story of how gang members influence kids, teaching them to sell drugs and shoot guns to get money, power and respect. The story also reveals that if juveniles do get caught with guns in Chicago, they still rarely get punished. Even fewer get sent to juvenile detention. Gangbangers use that to their advantage to lure kids into violent lives of crime.
  • Backfire

    The investigation revealed that the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) employed rogue tactics in undercover storefront strings in Milwaukee and across the country, including using those with mental disabilities to promote the operations – and then turning around and charging them with gun and drug crimes. The investigation found ATF agents set up operations near schools and churches, allowing them to arrest people on more serious charges; let felons armed with guns leave the fake storefronts; paid such high prices that people bought guns from stores and then quickly sold them to agents; bought stolen goods, spurring burglaries in the area; arrested and charged the wrong people; and drew in juveniles by allowing them to play video games, smoke marijuana and drink alcohol; failed to employ sufficient security, allowing sting storefronts to be burglarized; carelessly handled sensitive documents containing undercover officer’s names and vehicle information; and left behind damaged rental properties, failing to pay landlords for repairs. In Milwaukee, an ATF agent’s guns were stolen, including an automatic machine gun, which has not been recovered. The sting operations were part of an ATF initiative meant to go after “the worst of the worst” and target areas beset by violent crime. But in the Milwaukee operation and elsewhere, the defendants largely had nonviolent criminal backgrounds. Even a federal prosecutor criticized the ATF for the kinds of people targeted.
  • Backfire

    The investigation revealed that the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) employed rogue tactics in undercover storefront strings in Milwaukee and across the country, including using those with mental disabilities to promote the operations – and then turning around and charging them with gun and drug crimes. The investigation found ATF agents set up operations near schools and churches, allowing them to arrest people on more serious charges; let felons armed with guns leave the fake storefronts; paid such high prices that people bought guns from stores and then quickly sold them to agents; bought stolen goods, spurring burglaries in the area; arrested and charged the wrong people; and drew in juveniles by allowing them to play video games, smoke marijuana and drink alcohol; failed to employ sufficient security, allowing sting storefronts to be burglarized; carelessly handled sensitive documents containing undercover officer’s names and vehicle information; and left behind damaged rental properties, failing to pay landlords for repairs. In Milwaukee, an ATF agent’s guns were stolen, including an automatic machine gun, which has not been recovered. The sting operations were part of an ATF initiative meant to go after “the worst of the worst” and target areas beset by violent crime. But in the Milwaukee operation and elsewhere, the defendants largely had nonviolent criminal backgrounds. Even a federal prosecutor criticized the ATF for the kinds of people targeted.
  • Arrested Development

    For thousands of youths accused of crimes, punishment preceeds any conviction. The may be held for months or even years in county jails for -- and sometimes with -- adult suspects. Scripps Howard News Service reports on the 7,500 junveiles in adult jails at any time, their conditions of confinement and how a loophole in federal law allows jails in 29 states to house juveniles with adults.
  • Our Youngest Killers: Juveniles Serving Life w/o Parole in Massachusetts

    15 years after the Massachusetts Legislature passed one of the harshest juvenile murderer sentencing laws in the country, the New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR) revealed, for the first time, serious disparities in the way juvenile killers have been punished under the law.