Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "miners" ...

  • NPR/PBS Frontline/Ohio Valley ReSource: Coal's Deadly Dust

    Coal's Deadly Dust asked a fundamental question about an unprecedented epidemic of the advanced stage of black lung disease (Progressive Massive Fibrosis or PMF), among coal miners. How and why did this happen? How could it happen given a regulatory system designed to protect miners from the toxic dust that causes disease? The investigation documented the failure of federal regulators and the mining industry to protect coal miners from the epidemic of disease, despite clear evidence in federal data, clear evidence in mining practices, decades of recommendations to take action, and awareness of the danger.
  • NPR/Frontline: Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Coal's Deadly Dust

    This NPR/Frontline investigation of an epidemic of a fatal lung disease affecting more than 2,000 coal miners used 30 years of government data and internal agency memos to show that federal agency officials knew more than 20 years ago that coal miners were exposed to toxic silica dust, and were suffering severe lung disease, but did not act then or since to directly address silica exposure in coal mines.
  • Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge in Appalachia

    An NPR investigation identified ten times the number of cases of the worst stage of the deadly coal miners' disease black lung as federal researchers reported. NPR's findings indicate Progressive Massive Fibrosis (PMF), as its called, strikes many more miners and at far higher rates than previously recognized. The report comes as the federal program that provides medical benefits and cash payments to miners stricken with black lung is threatened by a multi-billion dollar debt and challenges to ongoing funding.
  • Mercury pollution in small-scale gold mines

    These stories explore the process in which mercury is used in gold mining, the social and medical effects and showcases several tragic cases of young children and adults afflicted with severe mercury poisoning. Tragically, the worldwide effects of mercury poisoning are only now beginning to become apparent after two decades of intense global increases in small-scale gold mining. But it’s becoming clearer that this is becoming a global problem in developing countries as the unchecked use of toxic mercury in rural mining operations increase. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/unearthing-toxic-conditions-impoverished-gold-miners/ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/extracting-gold-mercury-exacts-lethal-toll/
  • Hidden Errors

    An investigation into serious flaws in the nation's system for regulating common medical tests -- ones that harm patients and then hide the results from the public. http://www.jsonline.com/watchdog/watchdogreports/hidden-errors-360092411.html
  • Los Nuevos Narcotesoros

    Univision News’ Investigative Unit, presents an in-depth report on the devastating consequences of illegal mining by organized crime in Latin America, taking viewers inside a criminal world where mafias that formerly only trafficked drugs are now exploiting the mineral resources of Mexico, Colombia and Peru to finance their operations and expand their power. Taking its cameras from the Mexican states of Michoacán and Guerrero to different regions of Colombia and the Peruvian Amazon, “Nuevos Narcotesoros” delivers a compelling account of how violent criminal organizations are taking over the extraction of gold and iron ore and victimizing entire communities by extorting, torturing and killing miners who do not conform to their demands, as well as gaining control of local governments through violence and bribery.
  • Civil Penalties Special Report

    In an unprecedented joint partnership investigation that took approximately three years, Mine Safety and Health News (MSHN) and National Public Radio (NPR) found that mining companies in the U.S. failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and that these delinquent mine operators had accident rate 50% higher than mine operators who paid their fines. These companies: defied federal court orders to pay; committed 131,000 violations; reported nearly 4,000 injuries. The joint investigation of MSHN and NPR exposed a loophole in federal regulation, and lax enforcement that places U.S. miners at risk. The result was a special report by Mine Safety and Health News, and a series of radio stories by NPR that provided the foundation to challenge and change mine safety law in the U.S.
  • Delinquent Mines

    In a joint investigation, NPR and Mine Safety and Health News found that American coal and mineral mining companies that had failed to pay $70 million in delinquent mine safety penalties - most for years, some for decades, and some while defying federal court orders to pay - committed 131,000 violations, reported nearly 4,000 injuries and had an injury rate 50% higher than mines that paid their penalties, exposing a loophole in federal regulation and enforcement that places miners at risk.
  • OUT OF BREATH: The Untold Story of Big Money, Black Lung and Doctors for the Coal Companies. An ABC News Brian Ross Investigation with the Center for Public Integrity

    A yearlong investigation, Out of Breath exposed how eminent doctors at a renowned institution, working at the behest of the coal industry, have helped deny sick and dying miners the meager benefits and affordable medical care they need to survive.