Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "police" ...

  • Black drivers bear brunt of citations from routine stops by St. Anthony PD

    After the fatal police shooting of Philando Castile during a traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, MPR News set out to investigate whether black drivers were disproportionately stopped by the law enforcement agency involved with Castile’s death. MPR analyzed thousands of traffic citations in a five-year period from the St. Anthony police department and focused our investigation on stops in which police had the most discretion to pull someone over. They expected to see some level of racial disparity, but the results were staggering.
  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • Deadly Force

    Deadly Force documented a pattern of harm and harassment by deputies at rural sheriff’s department in North Carolina. Two residents had been killed; others were beaten or threatened.
  • Edward Snowden's Guardian Angels

    On June 9, 2013, when Edward Snowden chose Hong Kong as the place where to reveal the massive civil rights abuses by the American intelligence services, he forgot one thing: where to go next. Still, he managed to escape the American agents, the Hong Kong Police and all journalists who were chasing him. This article reveals for the first time how Snowden managed to stay hidden in Hong Kong for two weeks before leaving for Moscow. And it introduces the people who helped him.
  • The Numbers Game

    The Naked Truth: Numbers Game examines the inadequate and outdated collection of crime statistics and how this practice skews policing and public policy. Fusion’s Ryan Nerz uncovers the reality behind the numbers. They wrangled raw FBI data to develop key insights into policing in the U.S. Plus, they learned how gaming the numbers can lead to further inequality, discrimination, and in some cases, neglect. Stats may not be sexy, but this data affects how we live our lives every single day, especially if you are black in America. http://tv.fusion.net/story/373011/naked-truth-numbers-game/
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Fatal Experiments

    Paolo Macchiarini has long been hailed as both a superstar surgeon and a revolutionizing researcher in the world of regenerative medicine. When he performed the world's first transplantation of a synthetic trachea seeded with stem cells in 2011, it seemed that modern medicine was one step closer to "the artificial man," where human organs could be produced in laboratories. But when the patients soon started dying, serious allegations of research fraud started to emerge against Macchiarini and his methods. At the same time, his operations were investigated by the police for suspected manslaughter. But Macchiarini was backed by the prestigious Karolinska Institute (home of the Nobel prize), which found that all in all he had done nothing wrong. Paolo seemed to be free of the accusations, that is until he let a team of investigative reporters into his world of the academic elite.
  • Inside the Shady Industry that Profits off Mugshot Photos

    “Mugged,” which premiered on Fusion on March 6, 2016 as part of the network’s monthly investigative “The Naked Truth” series, explores the multi-million dollar extortion industry of mugshot websites, which is wreaking havoc on the lives and reputations of tens of millions of Americans, especially minorities. In a completely legal process, operators of these websites collect public arrest records and photographs from online police databases and post the records on their own websites, often making the content more prominent via search engine optimization. These mugshot websites then charge the arrested individuals hundreds of dollars to remove their records and photos, despite the fact that many of these individuals have been falsely arrested, found innocent, or have yet to stand trial.
  • Suffering in Secret

    Illinois steered thousands of its poorest and most vulnerable adults with disabilities into less expensive private group homes and cloaked harm and death with secrecy and silence. The Tribune exposed flawed investigations (two cases were reopened) and revealed how Illinois had publicly undercounted abuse and neglect cases for five years. The Tribune identified 1,311 cases of harm since July 2011 and tracked at least 42 deaths in group homes or their day programs over the last seven years. Additionally, the Tribune uncovered a secretive state practice that allowed group home employees to police their own businesses. The Tribune also detailed a state auction in which group home executives raised hands to select individuals with disabilities to be moved from state facilities into the community. For the first time, the Tribune circumvented state secrecy to show that many group homes were underfunded, understaffed and dangerously unprepared for new arrivals with complex needs.