Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "power" ...

  • Under Fire

    In a powerful segment for Dateline NBC, Katy Tur investigates allegations of sexual misconduct in the United States Forest Service and asks why, after decades of complaints and two congressional hearings, many female employees still feel like they are faced with a terrible dilemma – commit career suicide by reporting their experiences or stay silent and never see justice.
  • Newsday Investigation: Pathway to Power

    In a panoramic, 30,000-word narrative, reporters exposed the underpinnings of Long Island’s corrupt political system through the life of a onetime street hoodlum who would eventually own a castle-like estate that became the Island’s unofficial political clubhouse and the site of a startling attempt on his life. Drilling deep below decades of numbing public scandals, the project is the defining document of how local power works on Long Island, how the public gets exploited and why unscrupulous operators persistently prevail.
  • WSJ: The Fall of Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn, the powerful casino executive considered the creator of modern Las Vegas, was responsible for a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct and harassment toward employees.
  • Unlicensed, Unpunished

    A single tip led the investigative team at Denver7 to uncover unlicensed, untrained and often unpunished health care workers diagnosing and treating vulnerable, sick and disadvantaged Coloradans. The team’s work led to criminal investigations, forced Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to intervene in the matter directly, and prompted state regulators to rewrite and reprioritize their policies. It represents a textbook case of journalists holding the powerful accountable by identifying fundamental problems in the institutions designed to keep consumers safe. Hickenlooper credited Denver7 for "actually making the community safer."
  • CBC: Unassisted Death

    In a powerful series of stories, CBC Edmonton revealed the devastating human cost of the medical-assistance-in-dying (MAID) policy of Alberta’s massive Catholic health provider, Covenant Health. By default, Covenant's policy prohibited patients from even signing their MAID request forms, or undergoing eligibility assessments by provincial medical staff, on its publicly funded property. Covenant Health also explicitly prohibits assisted deaths from taking place in its facilities.
  • The Trace: NRA Lobbyist Marion Hammer

    In this investigative profile, Mike Spies exposes how the NRA’s most powerful lobbyist turned Florida into a lab for the nation’s most aggressive gun laws.
  • The Texas Observer and Grist with The Investigative Fund: Too Big to Fine, Too Small to Fight Back

    Citgo refineries spew thousands of tons of chemicals into the air, degrading air quality and putting human health at risk. Despite Citgo's revenues hitting north of $40 billion, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality lets the company off easy. For her investigation in The Texas Observer, in partnership with Grist and The Investigative Fund, Naveena Sadasivam dug into how the TCEQ has fined corporate polluters $30 million for air violations, not much more than the $24 million imposed on gas stations, a significant percentage of which are owned by immigrants, just for record-keeping errors. The disparity between TCEQ's treatment of mom-and-pop operations versus large corporations favors those with money and power. The agency rarely punishes big polluters, often because of a legal loophole, and when it does levy a fine, lawyers negotiate big reductions in penalties. As a result, environmental advocates and small business owners say there's a fundamental unfairness at work with the way TCEQ treats the businesses it regulates.
  • The Star Tribune’s ketamine investigation

    Paramedics at Minnesota’s largest safety-net hospital, at the urging of Minneapolis police, were using a powerful sedative on people and enrolling them in a study without their consent, and in some cases where it seemed unnecessary and harmful. The Star Tribune’s reporting halted the studies and triggered multiple investigations.
  • The Lens: Power Plant Astroturfing

    Lens reporter Michael Isaac Stein confirmed that actors were paid to support Entergy New Orleans' proposed power plant in eastern New Orleans. A city investigation resulted. The company was forced to release thousands of pages of documents about the power plant campaign, which we found was much larger in scope than the so-called "astroturfing" in 2017 and 2018.
  • The Daily News: Detective Do-Little

    The Daily News’ investigation into Detective Thomas Rice exposed that he was fabricating fake witness names and addresses and repeatedly using them to close grand larceny cases on a significant scale in the Ozone Park section of Queens. Instead of being fired, Rice was transferred to another precinct, docked just 20 vacation days, and allowed to keep his detective rank and salary including overtime, while running his snow blowing and power washing company on the side with NYPD approval.