Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "pregnancy" ...

  • The Marshall Project and USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee: Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary

    “Too Sick for Jail — But Not for Solitary” revealed for the first time the devastating toll of Tennessee’s “safekeeper” law that puts people in solitary confinement who are mentally ill, pregnant or juveniles despite not being convicted of any crime — and sparked prompt changes to the state’s 150-year-old law.
  • Deadly Deliveries

    There is more to the story to the abysmal rate of maternal deaths and injuries in the United States than societal ills or women's lifestyles: Hospitals know how to protect mothers. They just aren't doing it. Across the nation, women giving birth needlessly die and suffer life-altering injuries due to substandard medical care.
  • Birthstory

    You know the drill - all it takes is one sperm, one egg, and blammo - you got yourself a baby. Right? Well, in this episode, conception takes on a new form - it’s the sperm and the egg, plus: two wombs, four countries, and money. Lots of money. At first, this is the story of an Israeli couple, two guys, who go to another continent to get themselves a baby - three, in fact - by hiring surrogates to carry the children for them. As we follow them on their journey, an earth shaking revelation shifts our focus from them, to the surrogate mothers. Unfolding in real time, as countries around the world consider bans on surrogacy, this episode looks at a relationship that manages to feel deeply affecting, and deeply uncomfortable, all at the same time. http://www.radiolab.org/story/birthstory/
  • Prosecuting Pregnancy

    The criminalization of drug use in pregnancy is universally opposed by health officials and drug policy experts. But the idea that prison is a fitting punishment for prenatal drug use has become widely accepted in Alabama. Starting in 2006, prosecutors began charging women who used drugs during pregnancy with “chemical endangerment,” a form of child abuse that carries a one to 10-year prison sentence if a baby is unharmed and up to 99 years if a baby dies.
  • Helpless & Hooked: The most vulnerable victims of America’s opioid epidemic

    A federal law requiring states to develop plans to protect children born dependent on drugs is routinely being ignored. As a consequence, Reuters found, babies and toddlers are dying preventable deaths, not because of the opioids in their systems but because they are sent to unsafe homes. We identified 110 children whose mothers used opioids during pregnancy and who died after being released to parents ill-equipped to care for them.
  • Down and Out at Inglewood Unified

    Inglewood Unified serves a low income, high minority community which sits in the shadow of Los Angeles. By just being born in this city kids are already at a disadvantage: high crime, high poverty, high teen pregnancy. So when the District received tens of millions of dollars in state aid as part of takeover, the hope was to clean up the schools. KPCC wanted to find out if that happened. We investigated Inglewood Unified schools and found conditions at an all time low: campuses dealing with rats, fire safety problems, exposed wiring and an increase in violence. We also found campus security was eliminated while the new superintendent of the district received a $150,000 a year personal security detail. There were results from their investigation, including a massive clean up and repair of schools, rehiring of campus security personnel and an end to the superintendent's security detail.
  • Hospital Regulations Let Formula Vie with Breast Milk

    A new federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report says nearly 80 percent of U.S. hospitals give newborns formula when not medically necessary. The investigation compares how Chicago-area hospitals approach breast feeding and finds that some hospitals are not strongly encouraging it.
  • The State of our Maternal Health

    In California, the health of pregnant women has been getting worse over the years and the maternal death rate is even worse that Bosnia's. The story investigated the causes behind what is making women sicker. One finding included showing that women in California are at a greater risk of having a cesarean surgery at for-profit hospitals where there is a financial incentive to perform this procedure.
  • Una Realidad Embarazosa: A Shameful Reality

    The story addresses the realities of teenage pregnancies in Colombia. The reporters examine the failures of sex education in schools and the lack of effective campaigns by the government. The story includes the profile of one young woman who, like many, chooses to get pregnant in order to escape domestic violence and poverty.
  • Motherhood behind bars

    The majority of women inmates in the Wisconsin prison system are mothers of young children. The separation of mother and child may lead to the children growing up to become inmates themselves because they need guidance and nuture while their mothers are in prison. Throughout child birth, pregnant inmates have their legs shackled to restrain them, which is not only done in Wisconsin, but 20 other states.