Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "prosecution" ...

  • Reuters: Immigration under Trump

    Over the last two years, the Trump administration has driven rapid and unprecedented change to the United States immigration system, implementing tougher apprehension, prosecution and detention policies for migrants who come to the country illegally. Reuters has stayed ahead of policy changes, often breaking exclusive news before official announcements. We have also used data to expose where administration policies have failed and to highlight inequities in the system. In these stories, we have relied heavily on a Department of Justice database known as the Case Management System. Reuters obtains the data set, which is used by the DOJ’s Executive Office for Immigration Review to schedule all court appearances, through monthly Freedom of Information Act requests.
  • Reuters: Immigration under Trump

    Over the last two years, the Trump administration has driven rapid and unprecedented change to the United States immigration system, implementing tougher apprehension, prosecution and detention policies for migrants who come to the country illegally. Reuters has stayed ahead of policy changes, often breaking exclusive news before official announcements. We have also used data to expose where administration policies have failed and to highlight inequities in the system. In these stories, we have relied heavily on a Department of Justice database known as the Case Management System. Reuters obtains the data set, which is used by the DOJ’s Executive Office for Immigration Review to schedule all court appearances, through monthly Freedom of Information Act requests.
  • Rocky Mountain PBS: Cultivating Crime

    “Cultivating Crime” took a deep dive into the underground world of illegal marijuana in Colorado. Coloradans thought legalizing marijuana would destroy the black market, but our investigation found it did the opposite. We revealed how law enforcement says Colorado is now a magnet for organized crime with international ties. Our investigation found that criminal prosecutions linked to the cultivation, conspiracy, and possession with intent to distribute of large amounts of marijuana increased dramatically after Colorado voters legalized the drug. Law enforcement officials said Colorado’s laws allowing home cultivation of marijuana opened the door for criminal organizations to move in from other parts of the world to grow large amounts of plants, under the cover of legalization, for sale in other states at much higher prices.
  • They Shared Drugs. Someone Died. Does That Make Them Killers?

    This was a year-long investigation of the prosecution of accidental drug overdoses as homicides. It is the first and only story to attempt to quantify the national scale of this emerging trend using court data. It also involved a review of 82 individual cases in Pennsylvania to examine where defendants fit on the user-dealer continuum and whether they were drug users themselves.
  • California Prosecution Fees

    The Desert Sun uncovered how residents of three cities in the Coachella Valley were being billed massive fees that paid for private attorneys the city had contracted to go after the residents' for minor city code violations. Petty offenses, like having a messy yard or hanging a Halloween decoration on a street light, led to thousands or tens of thousands of dollars being demanded of the residents. If they couldn't pay, liens were assessed. Following the reporting, the cities stopped the practice, state lawmakers made it illegal in California and a class-action lawsuit led to at least one city refunding the residents.
  • Broken system fails abused animals in Dallas

    A FOX 4 Investigation uncovered that Dallas’s system to investigate animal cruelty is so broken, no one agency is tracking all animal cruelty cases from start to finish. Out of 4,000 animal cruelty calls received by Dallas in 2015, only 11 cases made it to the District Attorney for prosecution.
  • Broken system fails abused animals in Dallas

    A FOX 4 Investigation uncovered that Dallas’s system to investigate animal cruelty is so broken, no one agency is tracking all animal cruelty cases from start to finish. Out of 4,000 animal cruelty calls received by Dallas in 2015, only 11 cases made it to the District Attorney for prosecution.
  • Reset Films: The Syndrome

    The Syndrome is an explosive documentary following the crusade of a group of doctors who have uncovered that Shaken Baby Syndrome, a child abuse theory responsible for hundreds of prosecutions each year in the US, is not scientifically valid. Filmmaker Meryl Goldsmith teams with investigative reporter Susan Goldsmith to document the unimaginable nightmare for those accused and shine a light on the men and women dedicating their lives to defending the prosecuted and freeing the convicted. Shaken baby proponents are determined to silence their critics while an unthinkable number of lives are ruined.
  • The homicide files

    A four-part series including: "At the Roundhouse: How detectives compel murder 'confessions,'" "How police harassed a family," "A police beating...and a decision not to charge detectives," "How detectives escape prosecution," and more.
  • Univision: A Tall Tale or Un cuento chino in Spanish

    A Tall Tale tells the story of a Chinese businessman who was arrested for drug trafficking after $205 million was seized from his Mexico City mansion and the political and corporate interests that underpinned his prosecution.