Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "protests" ...

  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • #UkraineDocs

    Our principal three stories — written by Smith and published on Dec. 13, Dec. 20, and Jan. 2 — revealed first that the Trump administration was hiding critical information about the potential legality of the President’s holdup of Ukraine aid, second that officials at the Pentagon were worried that the holdup violated a spending law, and third that the holdup ignited increasingly strident protests by Pentagon officials who said it was illegal and that it should have been disclosed to Congress.
  • Justice for Colten

    Colten Boushie, a 22-year old Cree youth was shot in the head by Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley. That is undisputed. So, why the not-guilty verdict? That decision sparked protests across the country and brought race relations in Canada into sharp focus with some Indigenous people seeing a justice system steeped in colonialism and white supremacy.
  • The Injustice System: Cops, Courts and Greedy Politicians

    Our primary entry is an hour-long, commercial free documentary that exposes the role police, municipal courts and politicians play in a revenue-driven system of law enforcement in St. Louis County. KMOV’s investigation was sparked by issues revealed following the protests and riots in Ferguson, MO. News 4 Investigates repeatedly documented the abuses that are prompting major reforms in local police departments and courts. The documentary is part of a major ongoing investigation that includes more than 40 stories revealing misconduct, incompetence, racism and greed in policing and the courts. KMOV’s investigation prompted the Bellefontaine Neighbors police department to end its ticket quota system. It also forced the resignation of a judge, the termination of a police officer, and following our report on the Bellefontaine Neighbors PD, city officials met with representatives from the United States Department of Justice for a series of community meetings focusing on policing practices. Our stories were played during those meetings. KMOV’s reports were also played by state senators during sessions of the Missouri state legislature and cited as part of the evidence documenting the need for reform.
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • Motherless Monkeys

    Noah Phillips' story exposed for the first time a controversial planned experiment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that involved depriving newborn monkeys of their mothers and exposing them to frightening situations to gauge the impact on their brain functioning and behavior. The experiment calls for the monkeys to then be euthanized when they turn 1. Phillips' even-handed treatment of animal activists and researchers alike lead him to obtain unprecedented access to the facilities at UW-Madison, which has been the target of frequent protests because of its controversial animal experiments dating back to the 1940s. Phillips' story has been praised by both sides for its accurate and insightful portrayal of the proposed study. It generated significant public debate -- including an online signature campaign that garnered more than 300,000 signatures -- and revealed a deep division among UW-Madison officials about the propriety of the research, which as of this date remains stalled.
  • Who’s to blame for El Salvador’s gang violence?

    While countless news outlets rushed to cover protests against the flood of Central American migrants crossing into the United States this past summer, NewsHour Weekend took a different approach. They launched an investigation into why an estimated 230,000 Central Americans felt the need to flee countries like El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. Their investigation, which focused on El Salvador, revealed that the current mass exodus of Salvadorans has actually been thirty years in the making. It was fueled by a combination of American foreign policy decisions in the 1980’s and an act of congress in the mid 1990’s. The story ultimately raises questions about United States culpability in the current predicament.
  • They Died At The Hands of Cops

    Following a Staten Island grand jury’s decision on Dec. 3, 2014 to not indict the officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, the New York Daily News set out to determine just how often NYPD officers had suffered criminal repercussions for killing another person. With protests mounting, the demand for answers in our community was great. The newspaper marshaled its projects team, two senior courts reporters and a police reporter to answer this key question as quickly as possible. The paper’s findings — that NYPD officers had killed at least 179 people while on duty over the past 15 years, and that indictments had been brought in just three cases, leading to one conviction and no jail time — stunned the city and became an integral part of the larger debate over how these cases should be prosecuted.
  • Up in Smoke: The Chris Bartkowicz story"

    After KUSA aired promotions for a story taking viewers inside a medical marijuana grow house, the Drug Enforcement Agency immediately raided the grower's home. Protests outside the KUSA studios followed, along with a discussion of states' rights versus federal law regarding medical marijuana.
  • Freedom/Fear

    "This story is a comprehensive survey of how post-September 11th security measures have impacted life in all its facets across New York City, from the workplace to the library to the airport to the courtroom to Muslim neighborhoods to political protests."