Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "rape" ...

  • From criminal to cop in Alaska’s most vulnerable villages

    The rape and death of a teenage girl in a remote Alaska village led to this investigation revealing that Alaska communities routinely hire criminals as police officers.
  • Inside the Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

    In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Dishonorable Conduct

    This prime time documentary showcased a year's worth of investigative reporting from WSMV-TV's investigative unit into the Tennessee National Guard, prompting developments including an assistant district attorney publicly questioning the Governor and the Major General, and a Molotov cocktail thrown at the house of one of our whistleblowers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD-2vDBdIOE&feature=youtu.be http://www.wsmv.com/story/31370495/court-records-testimony-show-recruiter-accused-of-rape-before-shooting-guardsmen http://www.wsmv.com/story/32296052/retired-first-sgt-says-curse-filled-resignation-letters-stems-from-toxic-leadership
  • Rape Victim Jailed: Jenny's Story

    A mentally ill rape victim who had a breakdown on the witness stand while testifying against her attacker was thrown in jail by the Harris County District Attorney's Office for nearly a month. Prosecutors worried she would not return weeks later to complete her testimony. The prosecutor’s conduct and the abuse the rape victim was subjected to in jail was exposed by the reporters. The reporters exposed a series of mistakes by jail staff that further victimized the woman. The outrage and fallout from their reporting quickly became the central campaign issue in the race for Harris County District Attorney between incumbent Devon Anderson and challenger Kim Ogg. On election night, Ogg defeated Anderson by a 7 point margin and cited the “Jenny” story as the defining issue of the campaign in her acceptance speech. Ogg fired the prosecutor who handled the case and started a new sex crimes unit to protect victims and witnesses. State senators on both sides of the aisle filed new legislation for the 2017 session to mandate legal representation for witnesses held on bonds for their testimony, a statewide solution to the problem the reporters exposed.
  • Mexico's Crackdown on Central American Migrants

    In January and February 2015, In These Times reporter Joseph Sorrentino interviewed dozens of Central American migrants along one of Mexico's main migration routes. He found that a Mexican government initiative to more aggressively police and deport migrants had forced them to take slower and more dangerous routes, leaving them easier prey to robbery, rape, extortion, kidnapping, assault and murder by gangs and narcos. Mexico's stepped-up border enforcement was the result of U.S. pressure on Mexico to halt the "surge" of Central American children reaching the U.S. border.
  • School District Cover-up

    We exposed how the Paradise Valley Unified School District worked hard to keep the sexual assault of a special needs student hidden from parents and students and worked to protect their own teachers when they failed to properly chaperone the Pinnacle High School Homecoming dance. During the course of my investigation into that I discovered a nugget of information in a police document. Then I asked if any of the surveillance cameras were working at Pinnacle High School. The answer was shocking, no. Then I was asked repeatedly not to disclose it to the public. We did what was in the best interest of student and staff safety. We forced their hand when they admitted they do not work and then proceeded to attack us for our reporting. https://youtu.be/0S5niegxyXA http://legacy.12news.com/story/news/local/valley/2016/02/05/feds-investigate-wake-alleged-rape-pinnacle-hs/79902264/
  • Changing a Culture of Assault

    This is an in-depth piece about rape culture on college campuses, especially Texas Tech. It includes stories from survivors of sexual assault and extensive data to provide insight.
  • Harvest of Terror, Parts 1 & 2

    The first story in the series detailed for the first time the worst instance of workplace rape in modern Florida history. The report revealed how a rural sheriff's office and local prosecutors had failed at least five women who reported being sexually assaulted by their bosses at a packing plant. The piece also revealed how the plant's owner ignored multiple warnings that women were being assaulted at the facility. The second piece documented the larger problem of rapes among migrant women in rural Hendry County, Florida. It described unreported recent rapes in the area and showed that the small county's sexual assault rate is significantly higher than the national average.