Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "reconstruction" ...

  • The Killing Rooms of Mosul

    Mosul’s reconstruction – investigating the continued impact of the worst urban fighting since the Second World War. We wanted to measure the scale of the devastation in Mosul’s Old City and understand what the residents were still going through nine months after the fighting had ended. What we found was a traumatized city with dead bodies still rotting in the open, and buildings containing terrible secrets of violence, death, and possible un-investigated war crimes.
  • Corruption in Iraq

    Before the Iraqi district of Sinjar in Ninewa province fell into the hands of the Islamic State, foul drinking water was making people sick with preventable diseases. The U.S. tried to fix the problem by digging wells and treatment facilities, but poor oversight and shoddy work from contractors left the area no better than it had started, despite millions of dollars spent in reconstruction money. An investigation into Iraqi efforts to fix the problem after the U.S. withdrew showed that projects remained unfinished, but money for maintenance and fuel continued to pour into the pockets of local officials. In an area where extremists use frustration over corruption to recruit followers. the implications of this corruption couldn’t be more serious.
  • Costly Detours

    The Journal News' investigation of the troubled reconstruction of Interstate 287 revealed rampant cost overruns and delays amid lax oversight by state and federal authorities. The lapses drove the cost to more than $63 million per mile, twice as much as similar projects elsewhere.
  • Impossible Dream: Rebuilding Afghanistan amid corruption, nepotism, and mismanagement

    The investigation examines the Obama administration's efforts to create a modern, secure nation in Afghanistan.
  • "Breach of Trust"

    Soldiers on all levels of the U.S. Armed Forces used fake college diplomas to increase chances of "promotions and pay raises." WHNT-TV revealed that several AMCOM employees had also presented "fake degrees" to the "Department of the Army." The investigation spurred a reconstruction of HR Specialist training, as the command's "ability to detect" to false diplomas was severely flawed.
  • Cowboys of Kabul

    US Protection and Investigations, a company owned by a Texas couple named Del and Barbara Spier, was, until recently, one of the largest security operations in Afghanistan. The company oversaw security of reconstruction projects but secured no-bid contracts, submitted false invoices, hired men from a notorious Afghan warlord, paid off militants and demonstrated many other corrupt actions. "The Cowboys of Kabul" details the actions of these and other corrupt contractors in America's war on terror.
  • Mississippi Developers' Pasat Includes Fraud

    After Hurricane Katrina hit Hancock County, Mississippi, a massive reconstruction project was planned to restore resorts, condominiums and a casino. The developers Paradise Properties of Florida vowed to spend $5 billion to help in the effort, an amount which is worth more than the real estate in Hancock County before the hurricane. But members of the firm have been accused of multi-million dollar internet scams.
  • Small Town Justice

    A Haitian truck driver, Jean Claude Meus, was convicted of vehicular homicide after a semi he was driving turned over and fell on a minivan, killing a mother and daughter. While no drugs or alcohol were present in his system at the time of the accident, prosecutors were able to push a conviction based on their assertion that he had fallen asleep at the wheel, and was thus driving recklessly. But WTVT-TV investigators "found convincing evidence that (he) did not fall asleep, and in fact, was trying to avoid an accident." An off-duty firefighter was a witness at the scene, and asserted that Meus was "alert and helpful immediately after the crash." Yet the lead investigator, who attended high school with victim Nona Moore, never interview Juan Otero, the off-duty firefighter. With the help of experts, WTVT reconstructed the crash, and the conclusion drawn was that Meus had turned off the road to avoid an obstruction. Further, WTVT spoke with jurors who said that with that new evidence, they would not have voted to convict.
  • Spoils of War

    "Spoils of War" is a three-part series that takes a detailed look at the corruption and fraud that occurred during the reconstruction of Iraq. Davidson and Schapiro found that a substantial amount of the reconstruction money was lost to corruption, bribes, and Haliburton, among others. They also found that U.S. taxpayer money was used fraudulently.
  • A Nation of Widows

    The adult population of Bosnia is now 70% female. Despite this, Bosnian women are not viewed as a priority by humanitarian organizations and funding for women's projects is negligible. Funding for psychological counseling has also been cut. Only one woman was elected to parliament in the October 1996 elections.