Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "rents" ...

  • California's Teacher Housing

    An EdSource analysis revealed that living where they teach is a fading dream for many California teachers. The analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for them. Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in the state’s coastal and metro areas are being shut out of affordable housing. Others are also struggling to pay the rent. Rising rents coupled with an ongoing teacher shortage are driving an increasing number of districts to build their own teacher housing.
  • WSJ: Big Tech's Hidden Costs

    Congress and federal regulators do very little to police Amazon, Facebook and other big technology platforms that dominate the global economy and modern life. The companies say it's not their responsibility to protect consumers from online hazards, due to carve-outs in federal law for digital platforms. The Wall Street Journal investigated the many ways tech companies are passing on that responsibility—and the potential risks—to unwitting consumers. The Journal's reporting stopped Facebook from collecting sensitive personal data including users' menstrual cycles and heart rates; alerted parents to the lack of vetting for prospective nannies with police records including child abuse, sexual assault and murder; and forced Amazon to remove thousands of federally banned and unsafe products including toys with dangerous levels of lead.
  • The Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • Texas Tribune: Families Divided

    Thanks to unrelenting investigative reporting from a scrappy but devoted team of Texas Tribune journalists, the stories of migrant children separated from their parents at the border have fully come to light — and revealed the profound human toll of a sudden policy shift from Washington that reverberated around the world.
  • SCNG: Bad Apples

    SCNG's special report on teacher misconduct at a local school district found that district administrators ignored signs and complains of inappropriate behavior by teachers and in some cases outright abuse of students for years. Reporters Joe Nelson and Scott Schwebke spent months interviewing dozens of sources, scouring thousands of pages of documents and reviewing more than 100 hours of recorded interviews and depositions with victims, witnesses and parents. Their reporting has led to a state investigation into the district's handling of misconduct complaints and sweeping reforms within the district itself.
  • RMPBS "Insight with John Ferrugia" - "Imminent Danger"

    This project examines the issue of killings by mentally ill persons with access to guns. The story is told through the eyes of a mother whose mentally ill son murdered a sheriff’s deputy and wounded four others, and of the Sheriff whose deputy died. Both agree the confrontation could have been avoided if only state law allowed earlier intervention when a mentally ill person with access to guns is spinning out of control. Both did everything possible to head off the crisis, but had no legal tools to prevent it. The project also includes an exclusive interview with the parents of Aurora Theater killer James Holmes who explain they simply did not recognize the warning signs that their son was mentally ill and capable of homicide. They hold themselves responsible for their son’s mass murder.
  • ProPublica: Zero Tolerance

    ProPublica published a secret recording from inside a border patrol detention center which captured the anguish of children separated from their parents and forced the Trump Administration to reverse its family separation policy, then dug deeply into conditions at detention centers where thousands of separated children and unaccompanied minors have been sent.
  • NewsChannel 5 Investigates: Toxic School Water

    This yearlong investigation – more than two dozen stories that culminated in an hourlong, primetime special -- exposed students drinking lead-contaminated water inside Nashville schools, parents being kept in the dark about the test results, as well as officials secretly plotting to bypass lead filters to save money and using testing methods that disguised the real contamination. Through persistence and dogged reporting, we exposed a scandal that would make national news in 2018. As a result, the head of facilities for the school district was forced to resign. District officials were also pressured by Nashville’s mayor and health department to reform their testing practices. In addition, our intense focus on the issue in 2018 would be credited with reviving legislation that’s designed to help keep children across Tennessee safe.
  • KyCIR: A Louisville Family Reported Sexual Abuse By A Coach. He Worked With Kids For 15 More Years

    When he was 17 years old, Eric Flynn confided to his parents that his coach, Drew Conliffe, had sexually abused him dozens of times over a period of at least two years. Conliffe and his father, a former elected county attorney, paid the family for years for their silence. He apparently escaped serious consequences, despite two police investigations, even though dozens of people and several Louisville institutions knew about the allegation. In the wake of our investigation, several more alleged victims came forward.
  • Fox45: What Transparency Looks Like

    Baltimore is a city in crisis. Its murder rate is the highest in the nation. Its school system is among the lowest performing. For decades, its government has hidden behind a culture of secrecy and corruption. More than one year ago, Fox45 decided it had enough and challenged the status quo. On behalf of students, parents and taxpayers, Fox45 took the drastic step of suing Baltimore’s $1.4 billion school system - one of the nation’s largest. In the fall of 2017, when City Schools denied the entirety of a Project Baltimore public records request concerning the results of an internal grade changing investigation, Fox45 sued the school board. That internal investigation stemmed from a series of Fox45 reports which exposed a culture of grade fixing and pushing students through a broken school system. To date, Fox45 has accrued more than $100,000 in legal fees. But, so far, City Schools has been forced to capitulate. Bit by bit, over the year, they have handed over more than 10,000 pages of documents. And our fight is not over yet. The trial is scheduled for February 11. When it concludes, Fox45 will take another drastic step and send a strong message by filing a motion to recuperate our legal fees from Baltimore City Public Schools. “What Transparency Looks Like” was produced by Project Baltimore, a team of Fox45 journalists committed to a long-term investigation into Baltimore area schools.