Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "shooter" ...

  • Free to Shoot Again

    In cities from coast to coast, the odds that a shooter will be brought to justice are abysmally low and dropping. Police make an arrest in fewer than half of the murders committed with firearms. If the victim survives being shot, the chance of arrest drops to 1 out of 3. Staffing constraints are so dire at many police departments that thousands of nonfatal shooting cases are never even assigned a detective. The shooters are left free to strike again, fueling cycles of violence and eroding the public’s trust in law enforcement. The Trace, in partnership with BuzzFeed News and later WTTW, published “Free to Shoot Again,” a series of stories that interrogates this failure in policing and the toll that it takes on the people who live in the communities most impacted by gun violence.
  • Free to Shoot Again

    In cities from coast to coast, the odds that a shooter will be brought to justice are abysmally low and dropping. Police make an arrest in fewer than half of the murders committed with firearms. If the victim survives being shot, the chance of arrest drops to 1 out of 3. Staffing constraints are so dire at many police departments that thousands of nonfatal shooting cases are never even assigned a detective. The shooters are left free to strike again, fueling cycles of violence and eroding the public’s trust in law enforcement. The Trace, in partnership with BuzzFeed News and later WTTW, published “Free to Shoot Again,” a series of stories that interrogates this failure in policing and the toll that it takes on the people who live in the communities most impacted by gun violence.
  • The Hartford Courant's five-year fight for Adam Lanza documents

    The Hartford Courant waged a five-year battle for documents seized from Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter Adam Lanza's house and the resulting stories provided the most-detailed picture of one of the country's most-notorious mass killers.
  • CNN Investigates – The Parkland Shooter

    In the hours after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, CNN began scrubbing the background of Nikolas Cruz, based on source information that he was the shooter. Working nearly around the clock, using public records requests, interviews on the ground, and a vast social media dive, CNN was able to quickly piece together a profile of a disturbed teenager who was obsessed with guns.
  • Crumbling Foundations

    NBC Connecticut's Investigative team, the Troubleshooters, exposed a consumer protection failure unlike any other previously reported in Connecticut. Our investigation revealed hundreds of homeowners in the northeast section of our state are suffering incredible emotional and financial distress as they watch the concrete foundations supporting their homes crumble. Insurance companies deny their claims and the only option they have to fix the problem is to replace their foundations. That costs them into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. The Troubleshooters discovered there were warning signs and complaints years ago that got little attention from the state. During the years that have followed, the foundations continued to crack and deteriorate. And all cases we’ve covered appear to have a common connection: the same concrete supply company https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGULaeR47ZE&feature=youtu.be
  • Shots on the Bridge: Police Violence and Cover-Up in the Wake of Katrina

    Six days after Hurricane Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans, New Orleans Police Department officers opened fire on residents crossing the Danziger Bridge. When the shooting stopped, a mentally challenged man and a seventeen-year-old boy were dead, riddled with gunshot wounds. A mother’s arm was shot off, her daughter’s stomach gouged with a bullet hole, and her husband’s head pierced by shrapnel. Her nephew was shot in the neck, jaw, stomach, and hand. All six of the victims, along with two others arrested at the scene, were black and unarmed. Before the blood dried, the shooters and their supervisors had hatched a cover-up. They would plant a gun, invent witnesses, and charge two of their victims with attempted murder. The NOPD hailed all the shooters on the bridge as heroes. Shots on the Bridge explores one of the most dramatic cases of injustice in the last decade. It reveals the fear that gripped the police of a city fallen into anarchy, the circumstances that led desperate survivors to go to the bridge, and the horror that erupted with the gunfire. It dissects the cover-up that nearly buried the truth and the legal maze that, a decade later, leaves the victims still searching for justice.
  • Mind Games

    There's no dispute that Aurora theater shooter James Holmes is a killer. But is he guilty of murder? Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to murdering twelve people and injuring seventy more by opening fire during a midnight showing of the latest Batman movie in the summer of 2012. The insanity defense is rare in Colorado, and "Mind Games," by Melanie Asmar, examines several instances in which it was used over the past fifteen years in an attempt to illustrate when it works and when it doesn't. "Mind Games" attempts to explain a complicated plea in one of the most emotional and wide-ranging murder cases in Colorado history.
  • Fear at FSU

    These stories exposed the utter failure of a state’s mental health system to aid a sick man who was in crisis and begging for help -- and showed that the cost of that failure was a shooting spree at a major American university. They raised questions about the handling of the shooter's case in New Mexico, stoked a national conversation about the availability of quality mental health care for people in need and spurred a proposal to reform New Mexico state law.
  • Loaded with Lead: How gun ranges poison workers and shooters

    Roberto Sanchez suffered silently while racked with chronic pain. James Maddox quietly endured failing health. Manny Romo privately bore guilt for inadvertently exposing his children to an unseen peril. For decades, the stories of victims like these had gone untold until The Seattle Times’ “Loaded with Lead” series exposed a hidden danger pervading one of America’s most popular and growing pastimes. This series, the first of its kind, found that America’s gun ranges put workers, shooters and their family members at risk from an insidious poison: lead. “Loaded with Lead” laid bare how outdated industry safety standards, reckless shooting-range owners and lax regulation have contributed to hundreds of lead-poisoning cases nationwide. In an unprecedented analysis, our reporters discovered that regulators have only inspected 201 of America’s 6,000 commercial gun ranges, about 3 percent, in the past decade.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Ed: On Campus, Grenade Launchers, M-16s, and Armored Vehicles

    The Chronicle’s investigation revealed nearly 120 college police forces acquired military gear from the Department of Defense through the controversial 1033 program. Advocates contended the low-cost equipment is an indispensable resource during crowd-control situations or active-shooter incidents. Detractors argued the procurement of tactical gear fails to aid against the types of crimes that occur more frequently on college campuses, like alcohol-related incidents and sexual assault. Others worried military equipment is an especially poor fit on college campuses, and feared it may have a chilling effect on free expression.