Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "teacher" ...

  • School Violence

    A young woman sexually assaulted, a grade-nine student “jumped” from behind, kicked in the head and left unconscious, another beaten in the hallway while students watched and recorded on their phones, Indigenous elementary students chased and in fear, a black student repeatedly attacked, called names and physically assaulted. All of these students bravely came forward, seeking help from those who are supposed to protect them - their teachers, principals and coaches. School should feel safe but for these students and thousands of others, school didn't feel safe anymore. Gaining the trust of these young people and telling their stories in a meaningful, empowering way became our goal. CBC’s months-long investigation also took a data-driven approach to document what many called a rise of violence in Canada’s schools. We gave a voice to more than 4,000 students through a groundbreaking survey while documenting a shocking lack of reporting, countrywide.
  • Unsolved: The Devil You Know

    The body of Fr. Alfred Kunz, his throat slit, was found on the floor of St. Michael School in Dane, Wisconsin, on March 4, 1998. Twenty years later, the murder remains unsolved. Kunz was a conservative cleric and exorcist who clung to the Latin Mass and preached of a vengeful God. Some believed his death was linked to his battle against evil. Others believed his all-too-human flaws were to blame. The murder has never been solved, largely because police spent decades going after the wrong man, teacher Brian Jackson, our investigation found. Police never impounded Jackson’s car or searched it for trace evidence. Within hours of the murder, he was able to drive it out of the school parking lot. One detective who worked on the case for years, Kevin Hughes, set his sights on Jackson and refused to glance in any other direction. Ten years ago, Hughes’ lieutenant told reporters police knew who the killer was, but that the district attorney wouldn’t charge him. Their attempts to build a case against Jackson rather than remaining open to other theories may have allowed valuable clues to go unnoticed, the sheriff acknowledged during Barton’s investigation that became Unsolved: The Devil You Know. After about two years, the investigation stalled. Continuity disappeared as the sheriff’s department assigned new detectives to the case every few years. Over the past two decades, five different people have served as lead investigator. The case file consists of thousands of pages — and counting — snapped into 40 three-ring binders. The sheriff can’t name anyone working for the department today who has read them all.
  • California's Teacher Housing

    An EdSource analysis revealed that living where they teach is a fading dream for many California teachers. The analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for them. Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in the state’s coastal and metro areas are being shut out of affordable housing. Others are also struggling to pay the rent. Rising rents coupled with an ongoing teacher shortage are driving an increasing number of districts to build their own teacher housing.
  • The Deerfield Scroll: Gender discrimination and sexual violence alleged at elite boarding school

    Two respected teachers - also husband and wife - left our school abruptly with little public explanation. I investigated their departure and learned that the female teacher had filed an explosive lawsuit against my school alleging a years-long pattern of sexual discrimination and of alleged sexual violence against female students. I was under tremendous pressure by some faculty members and others to drop the story but I was determined to get it published so that my school could confront the serious issues raised in the litigation.
  • SCNG: Bad Apples

    SCNG's special report on teacher misconduct at a local school district found that district administrators ignored signs and complains of inappropriate behavior by teachers and in some cases outright abuse of students for years. Reporters Joe Nelson and Scott Schwebke spent months interviewing dozens of sources, scouring thousands of pages of documents and reviewing more than 100 hours of recorded interviews and depositions with victims, witnesses and parents. Their reporting has led to a state investigation into the district's handling of misconduct complaints and sweeping reforms within the district itself.
  • PublicSource: Failing the Future

    The project documents the wide economic and academic disparities among school districts in Pennsylvania. It tells the stories through the voices of students and educators in under-resourced districts and takes a deep dive into how school funding in Pennsylvania creates a system of "haves and have-nots." It uses both print and multi-media display.
  • Education Grant Debacle Fixed: Teachers to Get Millions Back After NPR Investigation

    NPR’s Chris Arnold and Cory Turner started digging into a Department of Education grant program after spotting a brief mention in a broader lawsuit. What they uncovered was shocking: a program gone horribly wrong for thousands of public school teachers. "It's ridiculous; it's mind-boggling. It's been two years of torture," was how teacher Kaitlyn McCollum of Columbia, Tenn described it. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. The program has a noble goal - to encourage aspiring young teachers like McCollum to work in the nation’s most disadvantaged communities. They agree to teach a high-need subject, like math, for four years in a public school serving low income families. In return, they get grants to pay for their own education. But the reporters found that’s not how it worked out at all. Thousands of teachers had their grants unfairly converted to loans due to a paperwork debacle at the U.S. Department of Education - leaving some bearing the burden of more than $20,000 in debt. Cory and Chris’ work not only exposed the program’s brutal inflexibility and it’s devastating impact on the lives of teachers; their seven stories, reported over the previous ten months, convinced the Department to offer teachers a dramatic fix. As a result of their reporting, the Education Department is now reaching out to thousands of teachers to return millions of dollars of grant money that was unfairly taken away from them.
  • Chalkbeat and Bridge: The crisis caused by students changing schools

    A detailed examination of a serious education crises that had been largely unknown in Detroit: Parents repeatedly moving their children from one struggling school to the next in an often-futile quest to find better educational options. In a city where school choice policies encourage school shopping, research shows that 1 in 3 elementary school students changes schools every year. Yet few local leaders or policymakers were aware of the high rates of student churn. Even fewer understood the impact that so much movement has on schools and on the ability of students to succeed. Our five-part series, called “Moving Costs,” set out to change that by telling the stories in a single classroom, where the typical student had cycled through four or more schools on the road to eighth grade. It shed light on the turmoil in classrooms where teachers must routinely scramble to accommodate new students, then see them leave mid-year without saying good-bye.
  • CALmatters: California teacher pension debt swamps school budgets

    California’s tax revenue may be surging thanks to a strong economy, but rapidly rising employee pension costs mean public school budgets are being squeezed.
  • #MeToo Unmasks the Open Secret of Sexual Abuse in Yoga

    A KQED callout for #MeToo accounts in the Bay Area yoga world and our ensuing nine-month investigation revealed a range of allegations by seven women against five teachers: from inappropriate massage to a violating touch in class, from drugging to sex with a minor. I found that the yoga community is struggling to rein in this sexual misconduct and abuse in its ranks. Some experts believe the lack of oversight of teachers and schools is adding to the problems of an industry experiencing explosive growth, where touch and trust are a fundamental part of the practice.