Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "torture" ...

  • Yemen’s Dirty War: An Associated Press Investigation

    A year-long investigative series revealing how key players in Yemen’s dirty war have engaged in atrocities and corruption — torturing prisoners, deploying child soldiers and stealing food aid intended for the starving.
  • Education Grant Debacle Fixed: Teachers to Get Millions Back After NPR Investigation

    NPR’s Chris Arnold and Cory Turner started digging into a Department of Education grant program after spotting a brief mention in a broader lawsuit. What they uncovered was shocking: a program gone horribly wrong for thousands of public school teachers. "It's ridiculous; it's mind-boggling. It's been two years of torture," was how teacher Kaitlyn McCollum of Columbia, Tenn described it. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. The program has a noble goal - to encourage aspiring young teachers like McCollum to work in the nation’s most disadvantaged communities. They agree to teach a high-need subject, like math, for four years in a public school serving low income families. In return, they get grants to pay for their own education. But the reporters found that’s not how it worked out at all. Thousands of teachers had their grants unfairly converted to loans due to a paperwork debacle at the U.S. Department of Education - leaving some bearing the burden of more than $20,000 in debt. Cory and Chris’ work not only exposed the program’s brutal inflexibility and it’s devastating impact on the lives of teachers; their seven stories, reported over the previous ten months, convinced the Department to offer teachers a dramatic fix. As a result of their reporting, the Education Department is now reaching out to thousands of teachers to return millions of dollars of grant money that was unfairly taken away from them.
  • War crimes and corruption in Yemen

    A collection of stories from AP correspondent Maggie Michael’s groundbreaking investigations of corruption, torture and other war crimes in Yemen.
  • Lasting Scars

    Prisoners waterboarded and tortured by the U.S. suffered enduring wounds — flashbacks, nightmares, depression, headaches — without ever being properly treated.
  • Solitary: Way Down in the Hole

    This four-part series exposed, for the first time, Minnesota’s heavy use of solitary confinement. By building a database and through prisoner interviews, we found more than 1,600 examples of inmates spending six months or longer in isolation over the past 10 years, and 437 instances of prisoners serving one year or longer. We documented more than 24,000 cases of inmates spending longer than 15 days in solitary—the time frame the United Nations defines as human torture. The series also showed how inmates come to prison with pre-existing mental illnesses and end up in isolation only to deteriorate mentally. The final installment told of the difficult path for inmates once they leave isolation. In more than 700 cases in the past six years alone, offenders left prison directly from solitary confinement.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • CIA Torture, a Senate Investigation, and the Google Search That Launched a Spying Scandal

    In December 2014, the US Senate released the executive summary of its long-awaited 6,700-page report on the CIA’s torture program. The heavily redacted document answered some questions—but it raised far more. In January 2015, VICE News set out to reveal more about both the CIA’s program and the Senate’s investigation of it. But we faced a daunting task: covering the story in the face of intense secrecy at the CIA, the Department of Justice, the White House, and Congress. We needed to figure out how to report a story when no sources were willing to go on the record—or, in many cases, to speak to us at all. VICE News found a way, producing a series of 10 groundbreaking and exclusive investigative reports that succeeded in closing the books on many of those unanswered questions surrounding the CIA’s torture program and the Senate’s investigation into it, laying bare previously unknown details about one of the darkest chapters in US history
  • Failures in the Foster System

    Our two part investigative series first uncovered the story of a toddler nearly tortured to death in foster care, despite multiple reports to county social services. Our second report exposed major flaws in the County's response to child abuse reports systemwide. We revealed an estimated 7,000 calls to the emergency hotline were not being answered each year, resulting in abused and neglected children remaining in unsafe homes.
  • Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq’s ISIS Fight

    Torture, beheadings, the cold blooded shooting of unarmed civilians, and all of it caught on camera in war-ravaged Iraq by the perpetrators acting with impunity. But the horror show was not by ISIS this time. An ABC News investigation, "Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq's ISIS Fight," found ample evidence of terrorist-like atrocities routinely committed over the past year by U.S.-trained Iraqi Security Forces, who Washington has been arming as the key to defeating ISIS. Incredibly, elite Iraqi Special Forces, special police and counterterrorism units were documenting their own horrific acts, filling the dark underbelly of Iraqi social media with gruesome snapshots and videos of their own war crimes in an apparent effort to stir up sectarian bloodlust. In the first in-depth exposé and analysis of these atrocities, the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Unit, led by Producer James Gordon Meek, spent six months collecting and researching a photo and video gallery of horrors, interviewing human rights investigators, U.S. Special Forces veterans and diplomats who served in Iraq, as well as confronting both the American and Iraqi governments with their findings. The team presented the investigation to millions over three consecutive nights on ABC World News Tonight With David Muir, accompanied by in-depth digital reports, both print and broadcast, on ABCNews.com and ABC/Apple TV.
  • The Secret Test

    Undercover footage reveals how doctors are carrying out “virginity tests” on girls against their will in publicly funded hospitals. The team approached a number of doctors across Sweden. One victim 15 at the time of her test describes the ordeal as rape and torture. The viewer gets an insight as to what is really happening in the doctors room, when the doctor isn’t aware that they are being filmed. The problem with virginity tests comes from the myth of the hymen- membrane in the female reproductive tract – that does not exist. A unique story that shows how some of the most vulnerable persons in the society are being subjected to virginity tests that experts compare to rape and torture – from the very persons that are supposed to help them – the doctors.