Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "trial" ...

  • AP: Cosby on Trial

    Bill Cosby’s conviction was one of the keystone moments in the #metoo movement. After years of abusing women while building a reputation as one of the nation’s most recognizable and likable celebrities, “America’s Dad” was taken to jail in handcuffs. That moment may have never happened had it not been for AP reporter Maryclaire Dale fighting for nearly a decade to ensure Cosby’s statements about drugging and sexually assaulting women became public.
  • Inside the Shady Industry that Profits off Mugshot Photos

    “Mugged,” which premiered on Fusion on March 6, 2016 as part of the network’s monthly investigative “The Naked Truth” series, explores the multi-million dollar extortion industry of mugshot websites, which is wreaking havoc on the lives and reputations of tens of millions of Americans, especially minorities. In a completely legal process, operators of these websites collect public arrest records and photographs from online police databases and post the records on their own websites, often making the content more prominent via search engine optimization. These mugshot websites then charge the arrested individuals hundreds of dollars to remove their records and photos, despite the fact that many of these individuals have been falsely arrested, found innocent, or have yet to stand trial.
  • Injustice in the Valley

    WJHL's review of abuse cases at Greene Valley Developmental Center, Tennessee's last state-run facility for people with intellectual disabilities, uncovered underreporting by the Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and a lack of proper investigation by police. The original investigation took five months and relied on hundreds of pages of public records and continued in the months after. Their findings prompted two criminal investigations, the arrest of a former employee for abuse (pending trial), a police chief's apology and a change in state abuse and neglect reporting protocol in Tennessee's Third Judicial District.
  • America's Super Polluters

    Industrial air pollution — bad for people’s health, bad for the planet — is strikingly concentrated in America among a small number of facilities, according to a nine-month Center for Public Integrity investigation. Findings were extended through a short documentary from The Weather Channel and a publishing partnership with USA TODAY Newtork.
  • Dangerous Exposure

    Toxic chemicals seeping from industrial sites across the State of Indiana are contaminating neighborhoods and putting families at risk of dangerous exposure. 13 Investigates discovered most Indiana homeowners are in the dark about toxins lurking below the ground or in the air. The companies responsible for the contamination promised to clean up their messes as part of a voluntary program offered by the State. In exchange, the state provides participating companies legal immunity from getting sued, but 13 Investigates discovered major breakdowns in accountability. Companies hiding out in the program for decades failed to clean up as promised. At the same time Indiana's top environmental watchdog agency failed to enforce the rules to keep homeowners safe. 13 Investigates Reporter Sandra Chapman uncovers what's hidden, presses for answers and finally gets government admissions that the State simply lost track of some sites and poorly managed others. In response the state created new directives to prevent stalled cleanups from exposing neighborhoods to toxic threats. http://youtu.be/cbACoNGvHMU http://www.wthr.com/tags/dangerous-exposures
  • Millennials: the trials of Generation Y

    The Guardian’s millennials project is the first in-depth examination of intergenerational inequality across eight countries over three decades. The data-driven series reveals the extent of income inequality between generations and shows young people today are worse off than their parents in some of the world’s richest countries despite decades of economic growth.
  • Locked In Limbo

    An Argus Leader Media investigation found that South Dakota routinely jails mentally ill defendants for half a year or more without trial because of scheduling delays for court-ordered mental competency evaluations.
  • Cock Fight: One Man’s Battle Against The Chicken Industry

    Chicken is by far the most popular meat in the United States. Every year, 9 billion are slaughtered for food. But very little is actually known about how they are grown, raised and killed. Indications are that the U.S. chicken industry, which is controlled by four major companies, would prefer to keep it that way. It’s not easy to get a camera into the sheds where industrial poultry is raised, known as a “broiler farm.” But Craig Watts, a third generation farmer from North Carolina, was willing to give the Fusion Investigates team unprecedented access to his operation, where he churns out roughly 120,000 birds every two months. http://interactive.fusion.net/cock-fight/
  • Two Degrees

    In the lead-up to the Paris climate talks in December 2015, CNN’s John Sutter led months of coverage on one number -- 2 degrees Celsius -- that is key to the planet’s future. The series looked at the scientific basis for that target, which is regarded as the threshold for “dangerous” climate change and is measured as a temperature increase since the Industrial Revolution. It also explored what happens if we cross that mark and what it really will take to avoid that level of warming. http://www.cnn.com/specials/opinions/two-degrees http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2015/06/opinions/sutter-two-degrees-marshall-islands/
  • Unreasonable Doubt: Did Kelly Siegler Really Railroad an Innocent Man Eight Years Ago?

    The story investigates the troubling findings of a judge who recommended that a man convicted in 2007 of killing his pregnant wife receive a new trial.