Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "warrants" ...

  • The CBS Evening News with Norah O’Donnell: Chicago Wrong Raids

    The CBS Evening News and the WBBM investigative team revealed an alarming pattern of Chicago Police officers raiding the wrong homes, traumatizing innocent families and children, and, in the process, violating citizens’ Fourth Amendment rights. None of the officers involved had been disciplined or held accountable by the department.
  • University of Utah Student Killed; Who Is Murder Suspect Ayoola Ajayi?

    Twelve days after the disappearance of University of Utah student, Mackenzie Lueck this summer, and following an exhaustive investigation by law enforcement, police arrested and formally charged the suspect in her death, Ayoola Adisa Ajayi. Ajayi faces four charges in connection to Lueck’s violent murder, including aggravated murder and aggravated kidnapping. KSL Investigators knew Ajayi was the person of interest in this case because he owned the small property in Salt Lake where multiple search warrants were executed in the case prior to his arrest. Before authorities released his name to the public, KSL Investigators worked to learn everything they could about the 31-year-old immigrant, originally from Africa, so we could break the investigation as soon as the suspect’s name was released. Although much of a person’s immigration status is private information, representatives with the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office confirmed Ajayi is a lawful legal resident and he was at the time of his arrest. However, the KSL Investigators exposed how he came to this country and revealed possible oversight by Utah State University and the federal government when he dropped out of school a number of times and was posting online about seeking to find a wife to keep his citizenship status.
  • WRAL: Police and Google

    WRAL investigation finds that Raleigh police have been using Google to find suspects in crimes. They are not gathering information on specific individuals; they are using warrants to obtain information on every Google-equipped cell phone that was within a mile or two of a crime scene. The users have no way to know that their movements are being reviewed by police.
  • Columbus Dispatch: Wanted

    This four-day series examines the more than 5.7 million unserved criminal arrest warrants in the United States. As law enforcement struggles to find and arrest these suspects, who are often wanted for violent crimes including murder and rape, victims wait in fear that their attackers will return.
  • One Year Later: CNNMoney Investigates Ferguson

    After a scathing report from the Department of Justice finding rampant policing for profit in Ferguson, the city touted changes to the police department and court system, while lawmakers heralded a new state law aimed at limiting the use of court fines as revenue generators. But we didn’t want to take the city’s word for it, and in an exclusive analysis eventually discovered that even after the DOJ report, the city continued to issue thousands of warrants over the same kinds of minor offenses the DOJ had highlighted. We also found that the problem goes far beyond Ferguson. Policing for profit has raged on in Ferguson’s neighboring towns -- keeping many of the area’s low-income residents stuck in a cycle of court debt and jail stints. Like a pastor who was jailed countless times for minor traffic tickets, a 27-year-old who has spent more than a decade trying to pay off tickets she got as a teenager, or a young mom who was arrested over not having a residency sticker on her car.
  • Dangerous Streets

    Three articles about the way the Philadelphia courts and police as well as the state legislature have contributed to what one judge called “chaos on the street.” Over the course of a year, the reporters looked into the variety of ways that law enforcement has failed to keep the public safe from drivers convicted of drug offenses, repeatedly drunken drivers and drivers with warrants outstanding for their arrest as a result of violations for dangerous driving.
  • Stop and Seize: Cops and the Cash They Confiscate

    After Sept. 11, 2001, federal authorities asked local and state police to serve as their eyes and ears on America's highways. The departments of Justice and Homeland Security, along with state agencies, spent millions to train them in an aggressive technique known as highway interdiction. But it soon became something else: Dragnets that swept up the criminal and innocent alike in a search for money. The Washington Post series revealed one of the great unknown consequences of 9/11. Local and state police, working through a Justice program called Equitable Sharing, have made nearly 62,000 cash seizures totally $2.5 billion since 9/11, without warrants or criminal charges.
  • Not Just the NSA Tracking Cellphones

    We uncovered search warrants that show not just big agencies like the FBI or NSA, but small local police departments are taking data off thousands of cell phones belonging to people not suspected of a crime. While this data is sometimes used to track bad guys, we found one case where it was used to track someone who stole a sheriff’s gun out of his car. Police can gather data from thousands of phones with almost no legal structure on what can and can’t be done with the data. No one is monitoring police and there are no federal rules on when a ‘tower dump’ should or should not be authorized. In some cases in South Carolina, police can keep all of the information they receive in a database for 7 years. It’s all happening without the public ever being told data from their cell phone was gathered by police.
  • Millions Owed in Unpaid Traffic Tickets

    The City of Lubbock is owed more than $1.4 million in unpaid traffic fines that have been issued over the past five years. Our investigation discovered that many offenders have multiple unpaid tickets and have warrants out for their arrest. We caught up with one of the top five offenders, who told us he is repeatedly pulled over by police but never taken to jail, despite his outstanding warrants.
  • Broken Justice in Phillips County

    A five-part series preceded by an initial investigation into dysfunction in the criminal justice system in an Arkansas Delta county known for corruption and poverty. The year-long investigation uncovered errors and archaic practices in the handling of fugitive warrants and speedy trials that allowed felony suspects to remain free for years without fear of answering to the charges against them. As a result, prosecutors had to drop hundreds of cases for failure to take them to trial in a timely manner. Since publication, the Phillips County sheriff has made changes in how his office handles failure-to-appear warrants, and court officials have reduced case backlogs. Nevertheless, problems persist.