Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "workplace" ...

  • Caregivers and Takers

    “Caregivers and Takers,” a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, uncovered rampant exploitation of caregivers at senior board-and-care homes across the United States. Many are poor immigrants who earn about $2 an hour to work around the clock with no days off while operators rake in millions. Some owners charge workers "room and board" for sleeping on a couch or in a garage. Caregivers are routinely harassed and fired if they complain. Some feared for their lives. Prosecutors liken these workplace conditions to indentured servitude. Many of these caregivers are immigrants, and evidence indicates that some were trafficked.
  • LinkedIn: Closing The Gap In Finance & Entertainment

    In the era of #MeToo and Times’ Up, LinkedIn partnered with CNBC to get a sense of the state of gender across the American workplace. We received more than 2,000 responses from LinkedIn members working in finance, entertainment and the motion picture/film industry in the U.S. Our questions tried to cover both the alleged problems as well as potential solutions, asking respondents to weigh in on if their careers have been impacted by the issues surfaced by the #MeToo and Time's Up movements and their ideas for how to make the industry more inclusive. We then interviewed more than 100 members across the industry to get their analysis through reported featured on the issues. To date, thousands of additional professionals both on and off LinkedIn have joined the larger conversation about the results and their implications for the American workplace.
  • Kotaku: Inside The Culture Of Sexism At Riot Games

    This entry includes the first investigative report revealing the sexist culture at Riot Games, the publisher of one of the most popular video games in the world, League of Legends, as well as several follow-up reports documenting Riot Games' response.
  • CBC Radio: #MeToo in Medicine

    The #MeToo in Medicine breaks the code of silence in healthcare to expose the hierarchical culture of medicine which allows for those in senior positions to sexually harass and abuse their junior colleagues. The story profiles two physicians who speak out for the first time about how they were sexually harassed on the job by their superiors.
  • 60 Minutes: The Spotted Pig

    Anderson Cooper speaks to restaurant workers who say they were sexually harassed or assaulted at the stylish New York eatery called "The Spotted Pig." At the heart of the accusations are the restaurant's owner Ken Friedman and celebrity Chef Mario Batali.
  • Harvest of Terror, Parts 1 & 2

    The first story in the series detailed for the first time the worst instance of workplace rape in modern Florida history. The report revealed how a rural sheriff's office and local prosecutors had failed at least five women who reported being sexually assaulted by their bosses at a packing plant. The piece also revealed how the plant's owner ignored multiple warnings that women were being assaulted at the facility. The second piece documented the larger problem of rapes among migrant women in rural Hendry County, Florida. It described unreported recent rapes in the area and showed that the small county's sexual assault rate is significantly higher than the national average.
  • Tragic Harvest

    In “Tragic Harvest,” the Star Tribune revealed that farm deaths in Minnesota and other Midwestern states spiked in the past decade, and that virtually nothing is being done to combat the problem here. In fact, state and federal officials charged with overseeing workplace safety were unaware of the surge in deaths. We showed that most of the deaths are occurring on small farms that are exempt from government oversight, and that most fatal accidents occurred because farm workers violated workplace safety rules. We also showed how Washington, one of the few states to enforce workplace safety rules on small farms, has been able to reduce fatal accidents and significantly improve conditions for farm workers.
  • Awash in Risk

    In the shadow of the American petrochemical industry, hundreds of workers perform a crucial, dangerous and utterly invisible task. They physically climb inside tanker trucks and rail tank cars and chemical barges to clean them out. The men, nearly all black and Latino, come in direct contact with fiercely corrosive chemical leftovers and fumes, often working with scrapers and razor blades to get every square inch of the insides clean. Some say they do so without so much as a mask. Many have died. Generating data from scratch, frequenting truck stops, knocking on doors and collecting obscure business sources, the Houston Chronicle provides a first instance look at this previously unknown industry, cross referencing every found workplace with OSHA records to paint a picture of a labor that has passed mostly under the radar.
  • Inside Energy: Dark Side Of The Boom: Workplace Fatalities In Oil And Gas

    It’s no great surprise that the oil and gas industry is dangerous—but just how dangerous? And how bad does it have to get before regulators and elected officials step in and do something? Those questions were the jumping-off point for this four-part radio series (and multi-part web series) about oil and gas worker deaths. Using original data analysis, we compared the oil and gas industry in different states and with other dangerous industries. We then examined ways to make a dangerous industry safer.
  • Temporary Workers, Permanent Insecurity

    The investigation into the issue of workplace safety of temporary workers emerged as a joint investigation between ProPublica and Univision News' investigative unit. Univision's investigative unit then continued investigating and exposed different cases of injured temp workers, including the death of a temp worker in a sugar plant. Blue-collar temp work is the fastest-growing and more dangerous segment of the U.S. labor market. Since the 2008 recession, companies have increasingly turned to temporary employees to work in factories and warehouses and on construction sites. In some states, temp workers are six times as likely to be injured than permanent employees doing similar jobs.