Extra Extra : Crime

Extra Extra Monday: Prenatal screening tests, prison labor programs and nonprofit donations

Oversold and misunderstood: Prenatal screening tests prompt abortions | The New England Center for Investigative Reporting

Sparked by the sequencing of the human genome a decade ago, a new generation of prenatal screening tests, including MaterniT21, has exploded onto the market in the past three years. The unregulated screens claim to detect with near-perfect accuracy the risk that a fetus may have Down or Edwards syndromes, and a growing list of other chromosomal abnormalities.

But a three-month examination by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting has found that companies are overselling the accuracy of their tests and doing little to ...

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America's gun-toting guards armed with poor training, little oversight

Armed security guards have become a ubiquitous presence in modern life, projecting an image of safety amid public fears of mass shootings and terrorism. But often, it’s the guards themselves who pose the threat.

Across the U.S., a haphazard system of lax laws, minimal oversight and almost no accountability puts guns in the hands of guards who endanger public safety, a yearlong investigation by The Center for Investigative Reporting and CNN has found.

Extra Extra Monday: Drug-addicted nurses, police shootings and lottery winners

Addicted nurses steal patients’ drugs | The News Leader (Staunton, VA)

A statewide investigation by The News Leader found about 900 nurses publicly disciplined by the licensing board from 2007 to mid-2013 for drug theft and use at work.

Across Virginia, scores of patients in pain during the last decade were denied necessary medication because a nurse was stealing it.

 

In 179 fatalities involving on-duty NYPD cops in 15 years, only 3 cases led to indictments — and just 1 conviction | New York Daily News

A Staten Island grand jury’s decision not to indict white NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for the ...

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Illinois sends state wards to residential centers despite attacks, abuse

In residential treatment centers across Illinois, juvenile state wards are assaulted, sexually abused and running away by the thousands — yet state officials fail to act on reports of harm and continue sending disadvantaged youths to the most troubled and violent facilities, a Chicago Tribune investigation found.

Reports of patient-on-patient sexual assault are commonplace at some of Illinois' largest and most relied-on facilities. Child prostitution schemes take root. Vulnerable children are terrorized by older ones and taught a life of crime. Some are preyed on sexually by the adults paid to care for them. And staggering numbers of wards, some as ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Baby boomers, school shootings and health licensing boards

Review shows health licensing boards voted improperly | The Boston Globe

Four Massachusetts health licensing boards met nearly three dozen times over five years without enough members present, casting a legal cloud over numerous votes on disciplinary proceedings, license applications, and investigations, according to an internal audit by the Department of Public Health.

The review, which confirms concerns first raised by the Globe a year ago, found the boards of pharmacy, physician assistants, dentistry, and perfusionists (who operate heart-lung machines during surgery) held 465 votes without a quorum from January 2008 to May 2013. Two observers said they were shocked by ...

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College disciplinary boards impose slight penalties for serious crimes

Secretive college judicial systems make it easy for students responsible for violent offenses – including sexual assault – to transfer between schools.

The Columbus Dispatch and Student Press Law Center used disciplinary records from 25 public universities to identify students who had transferred despite university punishment. Some of the students were reprimanded for more than one serious offense at the same school. Sanctions for such offenses are often minor – placing a student on probation, issuing a written reprimand, or ordering the accused to write a paper.

The investigation also found that most schools don’t understand or refuse to follow state and ...

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Federal records shed light on ‘staggering disparity’ in U.S. arrest rates

While police in Ferguson, Missouri arrest black people at a rate almost three times higher than people of other races, an analysis by USA TODAY found that trend extends to cities across the country. At least 1,581 police departments arrest black people at rates even more lopsided than in Ferguson. USA TODAY based its findings on arrests reported to the federal government in 2011 and 2012.

After prank, West Virginia trooper fatally shot uninvolved 18-year-old boy

The Charleston Gazette combed through hundreds of pages of investigative documents to recount the night an 18-year-old died after an altercation with a West Virginia state trooper.

Timmy Hill was shot twice, once in the head and once in the chest, after a struggle with Senior Trooper B.D. Gillespie. Gillespie had gone searching for the teens responsible for pranking him by putting wet underwear on his cruiser earlier in the night. Although Hill wasn’t involved, he’d met up with the teens who were.

The Gazette’s story uses interviews, photos and documents presented to a grand jury ...

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N.J. troopers repeatedly slammed Kenwin Garcia to ground during fatal '08 incident, records show

In an update to a major investigation released earlier this month, NJ Advance Media has found that a Newark man who died in 2008 after a struggle with police was repeatedly slammed to the ground by those restraining him.

The Oct. 1 report – published at NJ.com and in The Star-Ledger – focused on the life and troubling death of Kenwin Garcia. In 2008, Garcia was stopped by New Jersey State Police while walking along the side of a highway. An altercation ensued, and Garcia died days later. The resulting state investigation was largely glazed over publicly. No charges were filed ...

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Jacksonville children are in detention longer than Florida law intends

Florida juveniles are being locked up in Jacksonville-area detention centers longer than in any other part of the state and longer than the law intends, according to a Florida Times-Union investigation.

The wide-ranging look at the area’s juvenile detention system also found that kids are sometimes held in overcrowded conditions. The troubling conditions are draining taxpayers’ wallets and raising concerns about the legal system’s handling of juveniles.