Extra Extra : Sports

The alleged assault of Sasha Menu Courey

The University of Missouri did not investigate or tell law enforcement officials about an alleged rape, possibly by one or more members of its football team, despite administrators finding out about the alleged 2010 incident more than a year ago, an "Outside the Lines" investigation has found. The alleged victim, a member of the swim team, committed suicide in 2011.

Extra Extra Monday: Secret settlements, data breaches and university lobbyists

Mizzou did not pursue alleged assault | ESPN
The University of Missouri did not investigate or tell law enforcement officials about an alleged rape, possibly by one or more members of its football team, despite administrators finding out about the alleged 2010 incident more than a year ago, an "Outside the Lines" investigation has found. The alleged victim, a member of the swim team, committed suicide in 2011.

Mass. spent millions on secret settlements | The Boston Globe
For years, the state has used confidential settlement and severance deals to make embarrassing problems go away, often requiring workers to promise to keep ...

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Disciplined doctor behind controversial sports supplement study

The latest installment in USA TODAY’s ongoing “Supplement Shell Game” investigation published today finds that the key author of a safety study of the controversial sports supplement Craze is a doctor who has been disciplined in two states for issues relating to fraudulent billing practices and other misrepresentations. Now the editor of the peer reviewed journal that published the study says he has “serious concerns” about the research after being contacted by scientists and USA TODAY.

Mizzou did not pursue alleged assault

"The University of Missouri did not investigate or tell law enforcement officials about an alleged rape, possibly by one or more members of its football team, despite administrators finding out about the alleged 2010 incident more than a year ago, an "Outside the Lines" investigation has found. The alleged victim, a member of the swim team, committed suicide in 2011," ESPN reports. Read the full story here.

MMA fighting: Inside look at the brutal sport's rising popularity and danger

Mixed martial arts, or simply MMA, is cage fighting that mixes punching, kicking and grappling. Likened to human cockfighting and blood sport by detractors, its intoxicating mix of athleticism, intensity and violence delivers something people have been lining up to see since Rome built the Colosseum.

Still in its infancy, MMA already has entrenched itself in popular culture. It is a success on pay-per-view and cable, and it has started to gain a foothold on network TV.

But hidden from the excitement of fight night is a jarring world few outsiders see. The training, preparation and sparring required before even ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Campus safety, veterans' addictions and modern-day slaves

Campus crime reports not painting accurate picture of safety around USF, Univ. of Tampa, elsewhere | WSTP-Tampa Bay
Following a rash of violent crimes around the USF campus, WTSP’s investigative team digs into federal Clery Act reporting to expose the hidden dangers around many college campuses.  Most students will never know their off-campus apartments are often in the most dangerous parts of town – and most universities do little to prepare them for it.

VA’s opiate overload feeds veterans’ addictions, overdose deaths | Center for Investigative Reporting
Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the agency charged with helping veterans recover from ...

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'We Felt Like We Were Above the Law': How the NCAA Endangers Women

 

A new report on Oklahoma State's use of "hostesses" to lure in recruits reveals yet another instance of the NCAA normalizing sexism, the Atlantic reportsThe protective culture of men’s college athletics in Division I can be harmful to women. Perhaps the best example is that of Nigel Clay, one of two Oklahoma football players found guilty of gang-raping a woman in a dormitory in 1989. In 1992, Clay told the Los Angeles Times, “I don't know how to say it, but, bottom line, I just felt that sometimes, walking around . . . Well, speaking for myself and a ...
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