Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "deputies" ...

  • Deadly Force

    Deadly Force documented a pattern of harm and harassment by deputies at rural sheriff’s department in North Carolina. Two residents had been killed; others were beaten or threatened.
  • Only in Kentucky: Jailers Without Jails

    Reporters R.G. Dunlop and Jacob Ryan revealed that more than a third of the state's 120 counties elect jailers that have no jails to oversee. Several earn hefty paychecks for little work, putting their cash-strapped counties in a pickle, and hire their own spouses or children as deputies. Only in Kentucky does this curious practice exist. https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/only-in-kentucky-jailers-without-jails
  • Criminalizing Kids

    With disturbing national data findings, our multiplatform “Criminalizing Kids” report revealed that Virginia leads the nation in sending students into the criminal justice system for misbehavior as insignificant as kicking a trash can—and as trumped up as a 12-year-old accused of obstruction of justice. Our multiple follow stories revealed more examples of how disabled and black students are arrested in disproportionate numbers, and how Virginia’s governor and local cities reacted to our findings by instituting reforms. Our second in-depth investigation, “An Epidemic of Questionable Arrests,” took us in partnership with KQED public radio to San Bernardino, Calif., where harsh policies have led to deputies hogtying and arresting a Down syndrome student; an officer beating a student who hugged his girlfriend; and school police in one medium-sized district arresting more kids annually than municipal cops arrest in some of California’s biggest cities. http://www.publicintegrity.org/2015/04/10/17074/state-state-look-students-referred-law-enforcement
  • Rough Rides

    Denver Sheriff’s deputies, running the 16th Street Mall drunk van, handcuff intoxicated riders then fail to seat belt them securely into the cage. The results: 38 injuries in five years including gashed foreheads, stitches, and broken limbs. In more than half the cases, “braking” was a contributing factor, which raises the possibility the deputies are intentionally hurting the drunks (as payback for cursing, spitting at them etc.)
  • Line of Fire: Bullets, badges and death on the street

    Even before riots swept Ferguson, Mo., WPTV NewsChannel 5 and The Palm Beach Post teamed up to take on an unprecedented assignment: Track every police-involved shooting since 2000. We spent more than one year gathering public records and creating a database to track every detail from 256 incidents. Our joint investigation found Palm Beach County’s largest law enforcement agency cleared deputies in nearly every shooting and showed a pattern of rushing to judgment and ignoring evidence to reach those conclusions.
  • 60 Dead Inmates

    Between 2007 and 2012, 60 inmates died in San Diego County jail facilities, resulting in the county having the highest inmate mortality rate in California. It's a trend that's only gotten worse since a Bureau of Justice Statistics report showing that between 2000 and 2007, San Diego had the second highest death rate of California’s large jail systems. Through an exhaustive review of documents, CityBeat uncovered death attributed to excessive force by deputies, poor supervision of mentally ill and drug dependent inmates and a department that doesn't adhere to its own policies when it comes to monitoring the most at-risk inmates. This has resulted in at least five lawsuits against the county. We followed up our initial series by tracking deaths in 2013, and found continued lapses in policy and continued poor oversight of vulnerable inmates.
  • Behind the Badge

    Based on access to confidential Sheriff's Department documents, a Times investigation showed how political favoritism and negligence led to the hiring of scores of deputies whose records included violence, deceit and sexual misconduct.
  • Inside Fix: The L.A. County Tax Assessor Scandal

    The elected tax assessor, John Noguez, and his top deputies shaved hundreds of millions of dollars from the assessed values, and thereby the property tax bills, of homes and businesses owned by some of his biggest campaign contributors and clients of prominent tax consultants, who were among Noguez’s most generous campaign fundraisers.
  • Concealing County Corruption: Anatomy of a Cover-Up

    Wayne Dolcefino saves the best for last. In his final investigation for KTRK-TV, he and the 13 Undercover Unit demonstrated relentless persistence as they attempted to shake up a county government with an abysmal record of policing itself. This submission begins with four reports detailing shocking evidence of corruption inside the downtown precinct of Constable Jack Abercia. 13 Undercover spent several months doing painstaking surveillance -- catching the Constable’s deputies running his personal errands, working extra jobs on the clock and stockpiling never driven county patrol cars while lawmen were being laid off. 13 Undercover then managed to get a hidden camera inside the chief deputy’s office as he and two deputies talked openly about corruption inside the precinct. The language is often foul mouthed and always revealing. The FBI nabbed Aberica and two top commanders in a bribery sting weeks later. The veteran former constable is now awaiting trial. Eventually, 13 Undercover turned our cameras on county leaders to say “enough is enough.” Not only was action not forthcoming, it quickly became clear that many in positions of power wanted this all to go away without getting their hands dirty, without ending decades of a patronage system that made deputies feel required to give money to their boss’s campaigns and charities to keep their jobs. That was not an option. This investigation demanded accountability and we held leaders to the promises they made to the public. In late summer, 13 Undercover scored a major public records victory that revealed what one commentator dubbed "a cover-up of Nixonian proportions." The series culminated with the long awaited, and previously unimaginable, indictment of one of the county’s most popular elected officials – precinct 6 Constable Victor Trevino. New county directives now prohibit constables from soliciting money from their deputies and legislation is expected to filed in Austin to protect county employees from further shakedowns.
  • Moonlighting deputies funnel cash to sheriff

    Deputies working off-duty paid details at places such as Walgreens and Wal-Mart all pay Sheriff Marlin Gusman one dollar for every hour they work, providing Gusman with about $100,000 in discretionary money each year. Gusman, who often pleads penury in running his office, uses the detail money to throw parties for his staff and hire cheerleaders -- such expenditure is illegal, the Attorney General's Office has opined.