Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "north carolina" ...

  • She Says

    WFAE’s She Says is an investigative podcast series that followed the story of a sexual assault survivor in Charlotte, NC and the long and difficult process of finding justice. Over the course of the series, award-winning WFAE reporter/host, Sarah Delia and reporter Alex Olgin investigated how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases on a local and national level. In addition to conversations with the sexual assault survivor at the heart of this story, the podcast features interviews with current and former law enforcement, specialized nurses, DNA experts, and other sexual assault survivors.
  • Deadly Force

    Deadly Force documented a pattern of harm and harassment by deputies at rural sheriff’s department in North Carolina. Two residents had been killed; others were beaten or threatened.
  • Solitary Lives: An investigation into the secret world of solitary confinement

    In prison cells across North Carolina, government officials are meting out punishment that human rights experts say amounts to torture. For more than 13 years, the state kept inmate Jason Swain in solitary confinement - a punishment that research shows often causes and exacerbates mental illness. Swain, who suffers from bipolar depression, repeatedly swallowed razors and ripped open his surgical incisions. The Observer found he was just one of seven N.C. inmates who had spent more than a decade in solitary. Even 16-year-olds are confined to solitary in North Carolina - before they’re convicted of crimes.
  • The Final Days of Michael Kerr

    The death of inmate Michael Kerr by dehydration in 2014 ignited a barrage of activity in the state's corrections system and raised questions about prisoner treatment that reached the chambers of the North Carolina General Assembly more than a year later. Hundreds of pages of court documents pieced together the mentally ill veteran’s last hours in solitary confinement at a remote state prison, ignored and dismissed by an overworked corrections staff. http://www.wral.com/one-year-later-inmate-s-death-looms-over-prison-mental-health-debate/14506834/ http://www.wral.com/news/state/asset_gallery/14731191/
  • Campaign Finance Questions

    To date, our investigation has uncovered irregularities and possible violations of state campaign law in the campaign finance reports of XXX members of the North Carolina General Assembly. Our investigation continues. Recently, we reported that our questions have prompted an inquiry by the FBI. https://youtu.be/HJ9ZS2TZZQk
  • Cock Fight: One Man’s Battle Against The Chicken Industry

    Chicken is by far the most popular meat in the United States. Every year, 9 billion are slaughtered for food. But very little is actually known about how they are grown, raised and killed. Indications are that the U.S. chicken industry, which is controlled by four major companies, would prefer to keep it that way. It’s not easy to get a camera into the sheds where industrial poultry is raised, known as a “broiler farm.” But Craig Watts, a third generation farmer from North Carolina, was willing to give the Fusion Investigates team unprecedented access to his operation, where he churns out roughly 120,000 birds every two months. http://interactive.fusion.net/cock-fight/
  • State Workers' Boss Busted

    The News & Observer reported how Dana Cope, longtime head of the State Employees Association of North Carolina, used the association as his personal piggy bank. He promptly resigned, was indicted, convicted and sentenced to state prison, where he's being watched by the guards whose dues he stole.
  • Government Behind Closed Doors

    The most powerful local government body in rural, mountainous western North Carolina is the county commission. And once that body enters into closed session -- that is, removes itself from the public eye to discuss vital issues affecting thousands of people and hundreds of thousands of dollars in public funds -- residents are essentially cut out of decision making, or, in some cases, even knowing what decisions are being made at all. This Carolina Public Press investigative series removed the secrecy to bring the public back into the process, in an investigation that ultimately prompted the release of meeting details and, in some cases, the first-time development of local policies regarding closed county commission sessions.
  • Sweepstakes Shutdown

    WNCT-TV launched a two-part investigation in November 2015 examining why a local sheriff and district attorney allowed internet "sweepstakes" cafes to continue operating even though the North Carolina Supreme Court upheld a ban on these businesses. The investigation revealed the sheriff and district attorney's legal justification didn't comply with a recent state Supreme Court ruling. Less than two weeks after the investigation aired, the district attorney sent cease-and-desist letters to sweepstakes cafes in his jurisdiction. https://vimeo.com/150085981
  • The Disproportionate Risks of Driving While Black

    An analysis by The New York Times of tens of thousands of traffic stops and years of arrest data in Greensboro, a racially mixed city of 280,000 uncovered wide racial differences in measure after measure of police conduct. Those same disparities were found across North Carolina, the state that collects the most detailed data on traffic stops. And at least some of them showed up in the six other states that collect comprehensive traffic-stop statistics.