Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Georgia" ...

  • ’Drag this out’: Atlanta mayor’s office directs delay of public requests

    In a unique partnership, WSB-TV joined resources with investigative journalists at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Reporters, producers and editors crafted stories for the needs of their audiences and platforms but broke them in tandem. Management from both media outlets collaborated to make a formal complaint with the state after reporting on city officials frustrating Georgia’s Open Records Act. WSB-TV and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution are both owned by parent company Cox Media Group
  • Ohio Parole System Problems

    Over the course of 18 months, three young women were killed in separate murders by violent ex-felons who were supposed to be closely monitored by Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority. They weren’t. Time and time again, WBNS-TV’s investigative unit, 10 Investigates, found lapses in judgment and failures by the state’s parole system to closely monitor these ex-felons. In one case, a Georgia judge’s order to place a GPS ankle monitor on a twice convicted rapist was ignored. The reason: Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority believed it would be too expensive. Six months later, the man was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman. We also uncovered data showing part of the problem might be many of these parole officers are overwhelmed. State corrections records show there are 450 parole officers in Ohio tasked with monitoring 37,000 ex-prisoners who are under some type of post-release supervision. Given that workload, it’s hard for anyone to understand why these parole officers would be assigned to watch an empty parking lot. But that’s where we found some of them sitting every day, for nearly a month. Our reporting on this issue has already changed state law and led to the ire of some state lawmakers who are calling for additional changes.
  • Nearly 750 charter schools are whiter than the nearby district schools

    Politicians often sell charters as a solution for low-income black and brown students stuck in chronically poor-performing public schools. But Lake Oconee Academy in Georgia is one of at least 747 public charter schools around the country that enroll a higher percentage of white students than any of the traditional public schools in the school districts where they are located.
  • FOX 5 Atlanta $2 Tests: Bad Arrests

    "Test kits don't lie." That's what we heard on dash cam video as another cop led another innocent Georgian to jail based on the false positive results of a drug field test. In fact, some test kits do lie, and sometimes with terrible consequences. Our investigation provided a first-time look at the big picture and continues to change the way law enforcement trusts these tests.
  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Troubled officer kills wife, her friend and himself

    A troubled Georgia police officer with a history of violence and dishonesty shot and killed his wife, her male friend and himself in June 2018. An AJC breaking news investigation revealed that prosecutors and the local law enforcement community for years enabled Officer Robert Sasser and looked the other way in the face of a documented pattern of misconduct. This helped set the stage for his final violent act.
  • APM Reports: Voter Suppression

    A handful of states are using someone's decision not to vote as the trigger for removing them from the rolls. The APM Reports analysis resulted in the first estimate of the so-called "use it or lose it" policy's possible impact. We found that no state has been more aggressive with this approach than Georgia, where Brian Kemp, as secretary of state, oversaw the purging of a growing number of voters ahead of his own run for governor, according to an APM Reports investigation. Voting rights advocates call it a new form of voter suppression, and they fear it will soon spread to other states.
  • Murderville, Georgia

    When a brutal murder rocks a small Southern town, residents and police are shocked. Could the new guy in town be the one who who did it? Yes, the cops say, he is. Case solved. But then another murder happens. And another. In the end: four bodies, two convictions, and one man in jail for a crime he likely did not commit.
  • Waycross Cancers

    A spike in childhood cancers in Waycross, Georgia causes this small town to wrestle with questions about the causes of cancer, whether their community is safe, whether they should trust the government agencies that are supposed to protect them.
  • Many Unhappy Returns: Georgia recoups up to $6.4M after WSB-TV tax fraud investigation

    In what’s turned out to be the largest tax fraud case of its kind in state history, Georgia is beginning to recoup $6.4 million from taxpayers who submitted returns with inflated refunds, based on the schemes of a longtime tax preparer who also happens to be a local elected official. The state investigation was launched after WSB-TV dug into that official's past and uncovered a trail of civil fraud judgments, tax liens, taxpayer complaints and investment schemes. She had escaped any real consequences, until now.
  • Most who fail get a pass

    Georgia law mandates that students in grades 3, 5, and 8 pass standardized tests in certain subjects to move on to the next grade. Our analysis showed school districts were ignoring the law - with the blessing of the state education department - by regularly using an appeals process that was supposed to be a last resort.