Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "TSA" ...

  • Guns in Airports, Passengers Packing Heat

    2018 set a record for people trying to carry guns through airport TSA checkpoints. 4,239 guns were found in carry-on bags at airports across the country, that’s 12 guns every day. 86% of those guns were loaded. Our 11-month investigation focused on who was attempting to take firearms through security checkpoints and examined why there has been such a sharp increase in the numbers of weapons found in airports in recent years.
  • Boston Globe: Quiet Skies

    Spotlight fellow Jana Winter received a tip in June that TSA was running a rogue -- and possibly illegal -- new domestic surveillance program in which US citizens not under investigation or on any terrorist watchlist were followed at the airport and in-flight by air marshals who then filed detailed reports about their behavior.
  • Missing Airport ID’s

    This investigation revealed hundreds of airport ID’s have been lost or stolen at some of the nation’s busiest airports. Some missing badges were not deactivated for days or weeks because employees or companies failed to notify airport police. Those badges allow workers to bypass security screening and access the most secure areas unchecked. As a result of our reports, a bi-partisan group of U.S. Senators has introduced a bill that directs the TSA to increase fines for airports, airport workers and employers who fail to report badges lost or stolen right away. And it requires all large U.S. airports to notify Congress if more than 3% of an airport’s ID’s are missing. Our reporting also prompted the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General to launch an ongoing review of lost and stolen ID’s. Our team produced and reported the story for NBC Nightly News and the TODAY Show, bringing our findings to a national audience.
  • Transgender travelers singled out in TSA screenings, docs show

    The story reveals details of incidents in which transgender people were subject to heightened scrutiny when passing through US airport security checkpoints.
  • TriMet Security Secrets

    KATU ‘s On Your Side Investigators face off against the Transportation Security Administration to protect the public’s right to know whether security cameras safeguarding our nation’s mass transit systems actually work. The three month battle – fought in court and on camera, from Portland to Washington, DC - challenged transit officials’ blanket claim that the TSA had classified all camera maintenance and inspection records as ‘SSI’ – Sensitive Security Information, and thus exempt from public record and FOI requests. KATU’s reporting also rewrote the rules for which documents can and can’t be classified as SSI – resulting in a win for public safety, accountability and government transparency – not just in Portland, but for the entire country.
  • GM Recall Investigation

    When General Motors announced it was recalling 750,000 cars in February for an ignition defect, it could have been treated like just another case of a big automaker bringing cars in to fix a minor mechanical glitch. But when CBS News began investigating, it quickly became clear this was something else. We were the first to report GM knew there was the potential for the cars to shut off involuntarily, at least 8 years before the recall, and that three accidents were the subjects of three special investigations ordered by NHTSA.
  • Terror in Boston

    When terror struck at the Boston marathon, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Team raced to the scene and stayed for weeks, uncovering exclusive details and providing round-the-clock coverage surrounding the plot that tragically took the lives of three innocent people and brought the city of Boston to a standstill for five days. In a series of 17 stories in the week following the explosions, and a total of 35 aired television investigative reports in the month afterwards, Ross and his team reported on every ABC News platform and breaking news report. The team was the first to report that pressure cookers and components of toy remote control cars were used to construct the bombs, intimate details about what bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote right before he was captured, and new leads in the investigation, including a photo of the suspects taken inside a Lord & Taylor department store. Throughout this coverage, the ABC News Investigative Team worked diligently to fact check every detail in this fast-moving investigation. While other news organizations chose to air photos of two potential suspects early on that would then prove not to be correct or in any way connected to the bombing, ABC News chose accuracy over speed, fact-checking over error, resulting in coverage that broke numerous headlines and provided ABC News viewers and readers with up-to-the-moment details and exclusive investigative insight.
  • Spotlight on Shaken-Baby Syndrome

    The Medill Justice Project, through the hard-hitting reporting of student journalists, has taken on a largely overlooked and misunderstood area of the criminal justice system: shaken-baby syndrome. Scores of mothers, fathers, day care workers and other caregivers throughout the United States are being accused of violently shaking children, despite an emotionally charged debate in medical circles about the accuracy of the diagnosis. Our relentless examination of this issue—through published investigative articles, breaking stories, fight for public records, motions in federal court, multimedia features and other stories—has provided a deeper, nuanced understanding of this complex subject. Our groundbreaking investigations into shaken-baby syndrome have uncovered revelatory information, influenced criminal justice proceedings, impacted public policy and challenged government agencies to abide by the First Amendment.
  • TSA Theft

    In the first nationwide investigation into a burgeoning problem of theft within the Transportation Security Administration since its inception in 2003, the ABC News Investigative Team compiled compelling data obtained through FOI requests, an insider’s tell-all, victim stories and its own tracking integrity test at TSA checkpoints that resulted in immediate impact and calls for swift change. The TSA, tasked with protecting the traveling public in the wake of the September 11 attacks, admitted during the course of our investigation that it had quietly fired hundreds of its employees for stealing the belongings of passengers. The ABC News team conducted a tracking integrity test at 10 major airports across the country, each chosen for its history of theft problems (as indicated by FOI data). We purposefully left iPads at TSA security checkpoints. In nine out of ten cases, TSA screening officers did exactly what they were supposed to do and returned the iPad to the ABC News Investigative team. But in one case, our iPad was taken and we tracked it using GPS technology to the home of a TSA officer (the last person our cameras in the Orlando airport also saw handling the device). The investigation resulted in the officer’s dismissal, thousands of responses from viewers across the country, and immediate calls from Senator Chuck Schumer and Congressman John Mica for reform within the agency. The TSA began conducting additional sting operations, during which a TSA officer was caught and fired in December.
  • Crime and Human Organs

    Bloomberg Markets magazine shows how impoverished people from Belarus to Nicaragua have been humiliated, maimed, and killed by organ traffickers and the doctors with whom they work. The stories expose the activities of transplant rings that supply wealthy Americans, Europeans, and Israelis with kidneys extracted from the poor.