Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cancer" ...

  • Waycross Cancers

    A spike in childhood cancers in Waycross, Georgia causes this small town to wrestle with questions about the causes of cancer, whether their community is safe, whether they should trust the government agencies that are supposed to protect them.
  • America’s atomic vets: ‘We were used as guinea pigs – every one of us’

    Atomic veterans feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. In the decades since the nuclear tests, many have suffered ailments such as cancer and blame the radiation. https://www.retroreport.org/video/atomic-vets/ https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4481099eafd746ff8e79bb13a6596e79
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers.
  • Toxic Safety

    A child’s car seat is the only consumer product that is required by law in all 50 states and it is crucial to keep a child safe in the car. However, this investigation revealed false advertising, legal loopholes and outdated federal regulations are exposing millions of children to concerning, even known-cancer-causing chemicals, in their car seats with no apparent safety benefit. Over the course of a year, KPIX lit car seats on fire, commissioned lab tests on car seats and the kids who use them, searched public records, mined social media, analyzed national car fire data and interviewed experts from every applicable industry. The resulting series sparked action by lawmakers, industry groups, consumer advocates, federal regulators and car seat
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers. http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/09/08/gov-doug-ducey-forces-out-juvenile-corrections-chief-dona-markley-after-questionable-firings/90094760/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/10/31/fired-arizona-workers-inundate-call-center-appealing-get-jobs-back/93083666/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/11/23/gov-doug-ducey-fires-arizona-des-chief-tim-jeffries/94350606/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/23/arizona-rehire-40-des-workers-227-remain-fired/95795356/
  • Derby Pain Clinic's High Prescribing Of Cancer Drug Extends Beyond Nurse

    Culling and analyzing newly released data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, C-HIT Senior Writer Lisa Chedekel found an interesting prescribing pattern: four nurse practitioners, all affiliated with a tiny Derby pain clinic, prescribed nearly all of the state's Medicare spending for the opioid painkiller Subsys. The nurses were responsible for 279 prescriptions for Subsys, at a cost of $2.3 million in 2014. Nationally, only 10 nurse practitioners prescribed Subsys - with the majority of prescriptions written by doctors.
  • When a 14-Year-Old Chooses to Die Because of Religion, Can Anyone Stop Him?

    KUOW online editor Isolde Raftery reported and wrote a devastating, nuanced account of how a Jehovah’s Witness teen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was allowed to refuse blood transfusions, a decision that ultimately cost him his life. Washington is believed to be the first state where a child has died after being allowed to refuse lifesaving care.
  • Contaminated Soil Lingers Where Apples Once Grew

    An Oregon Public Broadcasting and Northwest Public Radio collaboration found Washington officials failed to address known soil contamination at former orchard sites, leaving children at risk of exposure that could elevate their risk of lowered IQ, behavioral problems or cancer later in life.
  • The PCB Plague

    We discovered that a majority of public schools in Connecticut could be contaminated with toxic, cancer-causing PCBs, but no state or federal law requires schools to test for the carcinogenic chemical. Even though PCBs were banned in 1979, a loophole in federal regulations allows schools to avoid testing for PCBs, leaving the chemical in place where it emits gaseous toxins, and sending PCB particles into the air and ground during and after construction projects where it can remain for decades.
  • Family Conglomerate Runs Suspect Cancer Charities

    How four cancer charities raised tens of millions of dollars from generous Americans and spent only fractions on actual donations to cancer patients. Zero evidence found of listed donations to overseas charities. Traveled to Guatemala to investigate phantom donations listed on charity IRS 990 tax forms.