Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "data visualization" ...

  • Where's the party at?

    The Daily Wildcat set out to answer the age old question: where's the party at? Through FOIAs for police records The Daily Wildcat was able to collect data on where the Tucson Police Department had issued red tags, which are the citations for unruly gatherings that are commonly doled out when parties get out of hand. They created a heat map of the red tags issued around campus and created interactive data visualizations on the frequency of when red tags were issued by day of the week and calendar month.
  • Racial Slurs Are Woven Deep Into The American Landscape

    The removal of the confederate flag from the Statehouse in South Carolina spawned the re-evaluation of confederate symbols across the South. We were curious to know how many other locations across the US still had names that would be considered derogatory in today’s society. We used Vocativ’s proprietary technology identify cities, towns, lakes, springs, mines and local landmarks with a potentially hurtful name. We then created a series of data visualizations including an interactive map that can searched by state to show hundreds of federally recognized places across the nation that include racial slurs in their names. Some examples are Dead Negro Hollow in Tennessee, Wetback Tank in New Mexico and Dead Injun Creek in Oregon.
  • Welcome to Herointown

    The Herointown project used a combination of crowdsourcing, data crunching, data visualization and illustration to create a semi-fictional city that contained all 128,000 active heroin users in New Jersey. It was a unique means of opening up people's eyes to the breadth of the problem and showing those struggling they weren't alone. Through this narrative device, we were able to simultaneously show people the scope of the issue as well as connect them to the nuance in their own backyards.
  • Deep Inside the Wild World of China’s Fracking Boom

    Mother Jones' Jaeah Lee and Climate Desk's James West traveled to central China and uncovered alarming trends with global consequences. The duo reveals how as China, as it aims to wean itself from coal, has called on multinational oil and gas giants to help tap into its vast natural gas resources. As fracking technology crosses over from the fields of Pennsylvania to the mountains of Sichuan, so have questions about its risks and consequences. The practice, which has been linked to contaminated water, methane leaks, and earthquakes in the United States, may pose greater risks in China, given what one expert describes as a "pollute first, clean up later" mentality. Their yearlong investigation includes a five-part video series complete with data visualizations and charts, expert and insider perspectives, and rich, on-the-ground documentary footage.
  • The Walker Calendar Files

    Wisconsin's politics exploded on Feb. 11, 2011, when Gov. Scott Walker unveiled his plan to strip most collective bargaining rights from public employee unions. tens of thousands of protesters descended on the state Capitol, and Walker became a national conservative star. But as Walker's calendars revealed, he was known to the conservative establishment beforehand: Two weeks before Walker dropped what he referred to as his "bomb," he had dined at the Washington, D.C., area home of Republican power broker Fred Malek. The political turmoil sparked questions about how and with whom Walker had spent his time in office, questions that took on increased urgency as he faced a historic recall election in June 2012. The Center digitized and coded all 4,414 entries of those calendars to examine those questions. At the heart of the project was a series of four major data visualizations offering the public deep dives into the calendar data and analyses. The innovative, CAR-based approach to these calendars allowed reporters to break new ground about a man who had become one of the most thoroughly covered governors ever.
  • 98 Minutes

    "98 Minutes" is a collaborative multimedia investigation by WBEZ and the Center for Public Integrity. The project examines the death of a temporary worker due to burns he suffered on the job at a Chicago-area factory. It also examines crucial workplace-safety enforcement issues affecting temporary workers, a growing part of the U.S. labor force. Our reporting found that these temp workers face distinct hazards and that the federal government isn’t keeping close track of their injuries. Highlights of the investigation include (a) data, acquired and analyzed by WBEZ, that expose the lack of federal record-keeping concerning temp-worker injuries and (b) a U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration internal memorandum, acquired by CPI, that recommends criminal prosecution for alleged safety violations found during inspections triggered by the death, (c) recorded comments from top national OSHA officials recorded in ambush-style settings after the agency had failed to grant repeated interview requests and (d) recorded comments from a recently retired top regional OSHA official who suggested a way for the agency to step up inspections of temp-worker job sites. The project, co-reported by WBEZ’s Chip Mitchell and CPI’s Jim Morris, includes five components: (1) a 12-minute broadcast story, (2) a 3,500-word text story, (3) a timeline with still photos and text enabling web visitors to follow the 98 minutes between the worker’s accident and his arrival at an appropriate medical facility, (4) data visualizations showing the growing number of U.S. temporary workers and the lack of federal records about their injuries and (5) a 25-minute conversation about temporary-worker hazards and safety enforcement. The conversation, broadcast live and recorded for web streaming, includes experts and listener callers.
  • Who Can Vote? Comprehensive Database of U.S. Voter Fraud Uncovers No Evidence That Photo ID Is Needed

    “Who Can Vote?” is the 2012 project of News21, a multimedia investigative reporting initiative funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and headquartered at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Twenty-four students from 11 universities across the country worked on the project under the direction of journalism professionals. The project, launched just before the 2012 political conventions, consists of more than 20 in-depth reports and rich multimedia content that includes interactive databases and data visualizations, video profiles and photo galleries. Student reporters conducted an exhaustive public records search and built a comprehensive data base of voter fraud cases that revealed: • Since 2000, while fraud has occurred, the number of cases is infinitesimal. • In-person voter impersonation on Election Day, which prompted 37 state legislatures to enact or consider tough voter ID laws, is virtually non-existent. Only 10 such cases over more than a decade were reported. • There is more fraud in absentee ballots and voter registration than any other category. The analysis shows 329 cases of absentee ballot fraud and 364 cases of registration fraud. A required photo ID at the polls would not have prevented these cases. • Voters make a lot of mistakes, from people accidentally voting twice to voting in the wrong precinct. However, few cases reveal a coordinated effort to change election results. • Election officials make a lot of mistakes, giving voters ballots when they’ve already voted, for instance. Election workers are often confused about voters’ eligibility requirements.