Extra Extra : DocumentCloud

Audit: Welfare benefits going to dead people

Two years after a series of hidden camera reports which documented widespread fraud in Washington’s welfare programs, KING 5 has been following up to see if fraud investigators have shut off the spigot of misspent public money.  Their report uncovered confidential documents showing that thousands of Washington welfare recipients don’t meet one basic requirement – they’re no longer alive.

Read KING 5's full investigation here.

Oklahoma state agency heads get raises while employees wait

Oklahoma state employees haven't had an across-the-board raise in seven years -- but that's not stopping some of their bosses from cashing in. The 9 Investigates team at KWTV combed agency agendas and identified more than $250,000 in raises that state boards and commissions have given out to agency heads since this summer. The pay hikes largely coincide with an Aug. 31 study that provided new salary ranges for agency heads. See the story, and see the documents posted via DocumentCloud.

Extra Extra Monday: Pilots addicted to automation, 911 operators lacking training, county officials send poor to unlicensed care facility

Service Members Left Vulnerable to Payday Loans | Deal Book--The New York Times
Nearly seven years since the Military Lending Act came into effect, government authorities say the law has gaps that threaten to leave hundreds of thousands of service members across the country vulnerable to potentially predatory loans.

Detained border crossers may find themselves sent to ‘the freezers’ | The Center for Investigative Reporting
According to interviews and court documents, many immigrants have been held for days in rooms kept at temperatures so low that men, women and children have developed illnesses associated with the cold, lack of sleep, overcrowding, and ...

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U-T San Diego may have offered bargain ad deals to candidates they endorsed.

Tom Shephard, a political consultant for Bob Filner, a Democrat running for mayor of San Diego, noticed a lot of full page newspaper ads attacking his client; ads that he was quoted $8,000 for.

"Amita Sharma and Ryann Growchowski, with inewsource and KPBS, audited ads in the San Diego Union-Tribune every day between Labor Day and Election Day 2012 and compared the list with campaign finance records. The results show varied payments for ads, indicating the U-T may have offered bargains to the anti-Filner campaign and to other candidates and issues the newspaper endorsed."

Update: California's Fair Political ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Quick hits, not so special education and preferential treatment for public officials

Welcome to IRE's roundup of the weekend’s many enterprise stories from around the country. We’ll highlight the document digging, field work and data
analysis that made their way into centerpieces in print, broadcast and online from coast to coast.

Did we miss some? Let us know.  Send us an email at web@ire.org or tweet to @IRE_NICAR. We’ll add it to the list and spread the word.

NBC Dallas-Fort Worth
CDC says is recommended ariel spraying weeks before planes launched
"Was Dallas County's health commissioner slow to react to a key piece of advice ...

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DCS chief James Payne fought his own agency over family matter

The Indiana Department of Child Services director, James W. Payne, fought to discredit and derail his agency’s recommendations in a child neglect case involving his own grandchildren, the Indianapolis Star reported. The story is based on the newspaper’s review of hundreds of pages of documents from DCS legal filings, investigation reports, monthly status reports submitted by guardians and therapists, as well as police and court records. After the investigation, many – including the state’s Democratic candidate for governor – are calling for his resignation.

Boy Scout officials often helped cover tracks of alleged child molesters

"Over two decades, the Boy Scouts of America failed to report hundreds of alleged child molesters to police and often hid the allegations from parents and the public."

"A Los Angeles Times review of 1,600 confidential files dating from 1970 to 1991 has found that Scouting officials frequently urged admitted offenders to quietly resign — and helped many cover their tracks."