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IRE Radio Podcast | Broken Breath Tests

Police rely on alcohol breath tests to convict drunken drivers. But what happens when the machines they use aren’t reliable? Stacy Cowley of The New York Times looked into the problem of faulty breath test machines and found thousands of cases where the tests were thrown out. On this episode, Stacy breaks down how she discovered unreliable breath tests and the consequences they pose for real people.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Calisson  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Grey Grey Joe (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Fifteen Street (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Arizona Moon (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Two in the Back (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

Opioid addiction is a decades-long crisis that killed roughly 47,000 people in 2017 alone, largely due to the potency of fentanyl. But despite all the warning signs, Congress didn’t pass any legislation on opioids until 2016. On this week’s episode, we’ll hear how Katie Zezima of the Washington Post tracked inaction in Congress and visited a small town in rural Massachusetts to witness the consequences firsthand.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Noe Noe (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

The Yards (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Keo Keo  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Daymaze (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

McCarthy (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Tarte Tatin (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

Investigative Reporters and Editors was formed in 1975, the year before Arizona Republic reporter Don Bolles was killed by a car bomb. He died days before he was scheduled to speak at IRE’s first annual conference. Now, decades after his death, the team at The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com found tapes Bolles recorded before he was killed. On this special episode, we’re sharing the first installment of the their new podcast “Rediscovering: Don Bolles, A Murdered Journalist.” We hope you love it as much as we do.

You can find the IRE Radio Podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week’s podcast? We’ve collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

In Passage (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Town Market (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Thanks to our friends at The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com for letting us share this story. Kelly Kenoyer is the host of the IRE Radio Podcast. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

On this bonus episode, we’re sharing audio from the 2016 IRE Conference. In a session on narrative storytelling, reporters T. Christian Miller and Ken Armstrong explain how they wrote their Pulitzer-winning investigation, “An Unbelievable Story of Rape”. Their reporting is the basis of a new Netflix limited series called “Unbelievable”.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Cloud Line (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

The Kennicott (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Copley Beat  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

So Go We (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Building the Sled (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

When protests rocked Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014, few realized the tensions could be traced to a policy-based problem — local police were fining residents at abnormally high rates to fund the city’s operating budget. Mike Maciag of Governing Magazine spent a year looking into other communities reliant on fines. He found a trend that’s destabilizing governments in low-income communities across the country.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

The Telling (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Bauxite (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Pinky (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Elegant Weasel  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

When police kill civilians, the victims are often people of color. So, when Arizona Republic reporters Uriel Garcia and Bree Burkitt decided to investigate police shootings in their state, they knew their sources should be as diverse as their community. On this week’s episode, we’ll go behind the reporting to learn how they tallied police shootings, identified sources, and used data and documents to show the true scope of the problem.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Low Light Switch (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Between Stones (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Taoudella (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Deixa  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Myrian (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Night Watch (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

On this week’s episode, we’re sharing audio from the 2019 CAR Conference. Reporters from Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, Newsy, KUT Austin and ProPublica explained how they got data on “cleared” cases from more than 100 police departments across the country. The data showed police weren’t solving as many rape cases as they claimed.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Daymaze (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Vernouillet (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Basketliner (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0 

Stucco Grey (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

This is Our Home (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Dolly and Pad (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Sylvestor (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer and Abby Ivory-Ganja co-produced this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

Students discuss the Missouri Investigative Journalism Workshop for an episode of the IRE Radio Podcast.

On this special episode, students at the Missouri Investigative Journalism Workshop discuss their experiences at the weeklong summer program. Investigative Reporters & Editors supported the workshop, which was held at the Missouri School of Journalism. Corey Johnson of the Tampa Bay Times and Paula Lavigne of ESPN served as guest instructors.

Host: Matthew O'Stricker of Woodward Academy (Georgia)
Guests: Renee Born of Olathe North High School (Kansas), Ellianna Cierpoit of Blue Valley North High School (Kansas) and Kaden Meyer of Washington High School (Missouri).

Music: Sunday Morning by Podington Bear
Production: Sarah Hutchins, IRE & NICAR

Investigations today are full of data, documents and computer programming, but that wasn’t always the case. On this bonus episode, we’re sharing audio from the 2019 CAR Conference. Data journalism pioneer James B. Steele discusses his work with longtime reporting partner Donald L. Barlett. He also offers tips for finding stories and staying curious.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Dusting (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

These Times (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Palms Down (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Up Up Up and Over   (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Abby Ivory-Ganja and Kelly Kenoyer co-produced this episode. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

For decades, children passed through the doors of Catholic orphanages. Some never walked out. On this week’s episode, Christine Kenneally takes us behind her work investigating hidden abuses in orphanages around the world. Her BuzzFeed News investigation uncovered that dozens of children had died violently, their deaths covered up and lost to time.

You can find the podcast on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Google Play. If you have a story you think we should feature on the show, drop us a note at web@ire.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

RESOURCES

Looking for links to the stories and resources we discussed on this week's podcast? We've collected them for you.

 

MUSIC

Tessalit  (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Uncertain Ground (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Mercurial Vision (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Sensitive (Podington Bear) / CC BY-NC 3.0

Time Waste (Podington Bear) / CC BY-NC 3.0

Darklit Carpet (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

Blue (Podington Bear) / CC BY-NC 3.0

Airliner (Podington Bear) / CC BY-NC 3.0

Simple Melody (Blue Dot Sessions) / CC BY-NC 4.0

 

CREDITS

Kelly Kenoyer reported this episode. Abby Ivory-Ganja is our host. IRE Editorial Director Sarah Hutchins edits the podcast. We are recorded in the studios of KBIA at the University of Missouri.

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