Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Affordable Care Act" ...

  • Obamacare: Insurance Lost

    One week after President Obama touted the supposed affordability of Obamacare, claiming it costs less than $75 a month for most people, we found there was no state in which average policies priced anywhere close to $75: the national average was quadruple. Premium increases and higher deductibles provided such sticker shock that many Americans began giving up their insurance altogether, creating what we discovered to be a new class of uninsured under Obamacare. We learned that almost all of the increase in the number of insured has been due to Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, not the marketplace. We also demonstrated that just because you have a plastic insurance card in your wallet doesn’t mean your health services are covered: Millions are forced to buy health insurance, under the Affordable Care Act, that’s of little value until they pay tens of thousands out of pocket annually. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVbNVJ5qe8o
  • SERCO - ACA CONTRACTOR PAYING WORKERS TO DO NOTHING

    Employees at an Affordable Care Act processing center in Wentzville with a contract worth $1.2 billion are getting paid to do nothing but sit at their computers, a whistleblower tells News 4 The facility is operated by Serco, which is owned by a British company awarded $1.2 billion partially to hire workers to handle paper applications for coverage under the new healthcare law. A worker tells News 4 weeks can pass without employees receiving even a single application to process. Employees reportedly spend their days staring at their computers. News 4 requested the contract and information from CMS about just how many applications Serco processed, but it took months and legal action to get an answer.
  • Investigation of a Community Health Center

    With an infusion of $11 billion, the 1,300 community health centers across the U.S. have been hailed as the backbone of the Affordable Care Act’s plan to leave no one without health care. That’s a lot of money to accomplish a lot of good. It’s also a lot of money to tempt those with larcenous intent. Two years ago, Alabama Media Group discovered that two community health centers -- Birmingham Health Care and Central Alabama Comprehensive Health -- had paid more than $2 million for contracts to companies owned by the centers’ CEO. Now there are indictments and allegations of $14 million in federal funds being diverted to private hands.
  • Revealing the Cost of Government Contractors

    Federal procurement actions, whether for information technology, consulting services or project management, occur in a black box, closed off to the public and opaque to the inquiries of journalists and the public. For the most part, failures of these contractors remain low profile. That is, until the calamitous launch of Healthcare.gov, when the public saw firsthand--on a website that millions needed to use to secure health insurance--how badly these highly paid, politically connected firms and the federal employees who supposedly oversee them had done their handiwork.
  • C-HIT: Pharma Perks

    The Affordable Care Act requires pharmaceutical companies to publicly report all payments to physicians by September 2013. Some drug companies have already compiled, but few consumers know that the information is available or how to access it. What this story did is disclose for the first time for CT consumers: 1) how many doctors in Connecticut are high-prescribers of certain psychotropic and pain medications, (108) 2) the cost of written prescriptions (hundreds of thousands of dollars in some cases) 3) how many of these doctors received payments from drug companies (at least 43) 4) and the amounts that the doctors received from the drug companies ($30,000 - $99,000) It also reported that only 3 doctors on the high-prescribing drug list have been disciplined by the state Medical Examining Board.