Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "American University" ...

  • Assault On Justice

    When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value. WAMU 88.5 investigative reporter Patrick Madden, along with journalist Christina Davidson, teamed with the Center For Investigative Reporting's Reveal program and American University's Investigative Reporting Workshop to document and analyze nearly 2,000 cases with charges of assaulting a police officer. The results raise concerns about the use or overuse of the charge. Some defense attorneys see troubling indicators in the numbers, alleging that the law is being used as a tactic to cover up police abuse and civil rights violations. The statute “goes too far and criminalizes too much,” one expert says. http://wamu.org/projects/assault-on-justice/
  • Fear at FSU

    These stories exposed the utter failure of a state’s mental health system to aid a sick man who was in crisis and begging for help -- and showed that the cost of that failure was a shooting spree at a major American university. They raised questions about the handling of the shooter's case in New Mexico, stoked a national conversation about the availability of quality mental health care for people in need and spurred a proposal to reform New Mexico state law.
  • DC Council Contracts

    Lawmakers in the District of Columbia routinely approved lucrative city contracts for businesses that made hefty campaign contributions at the time of the contract vote. That was one of the most eye-opening findings of a months-long investigation by WAMU and the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University. It’s a power unique among state legislatures in the country; every contract worth a million dollars or more must be approved by the 13-member council. There was little oversight of this process until reporter Patrick Madden and students from the Workshop started delving into these contracts. The team analyzed nearly a decade worth of public records — and over 100,000 campaign contributions — to find out which companies were winning contracts and how much campaign cash they gave to the council members approving their contracts.
  • Coca-Cola vandal caught

    Sometimes the journalism gods drop a big scoop in your lap. That's what happened to me and the identity of an infamous vandal at American University. After months reporting on these cases of vandalism, one Public Safety official came forward and gave us all the information on the case. I knew it was my responsibility to follow-up, verify the information, and educate the campus community that the vandal had been caught.
  • UNC Academic Fraud

    The News & Observer's reporting revealed one of the worst academic fraud cases ever seen at an American university -- more than 200 lecture-style classes over a 14-year-period that never met, and largely benefited athletes at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. It also revealed another athletic-related scandal: The mom of a basketball star had been hired to fund raise, and engaged in an affair with the vice chancellor for fundraising, with both then taking personal trips at university expense. The reporting forced the resignations of the chancellor, vice chancellor and his favorite fundraiser, as well as the academic chairman behind the bogus classes. It prompted numerous internal reforms related to the oversight and accountability of academic, athletic and fundraising matters. It also prompted at least five separate investigations, including criminal, which is still underway, and has put tremendous pressure on the NCAA to investigate.
  • Chemical Weapons Buried In the Backyard

    The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists reports on the burial and sea-dumping of large quantities of chemical weapons by the U.S. Army since World War I. These weapons are not only immediately dangerous if uncovered, they also pose serious environmental and health risks. Expensive clean up programs are underway across the country.
  • American University in Bulgaria

    The American University in Bulgaria was established in 1991 a joint venture between the University of Maine, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Soros Foundation and the Bulgarian government. The school, the only American university in Eastern Europe, was meant to be a bastion of western thought and values in the former Communist bloc. Although the school has been open for six years, no one had really looked into whether the American university was living up to its mission as a democratizing force in Eastern Europe. What was found was both heartening and disappointing. For example, the students are highly motivated, but they are sometimes hindered by a faculty and administration that is not of the highest caliber. Faculty turnover is astoundingly high so the university has been unable to build a base of experienced teachers and administrators. In addition, the university faces massive financial problems that would daunt any school administrator.