Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "American businesses" ...

  • The Politics of Big Telecom

    The largest U.S. telecommunications companies have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbying, political contributions and influence campaigns that shape laws and regulations that will have long-lasting effects on how American businesses and citizens will pay for and get the online information they need to manage their everyday lives. For "The Politics of Big Telecom," the Center for Public Integrity combed through large databases of campaign finances, tax filings and regulatory reports, and interviewed dozens of people from top government officials to average people on the street to show how large telecommunications companies shape public policy to defend profits, hold on to market power and reduce choices for the public.
  • Cyber Espionage: The Chinese Threat

    It’s the biggest threat facing American business today but the least talked about by corporate executives. Experts at the highest levels of government agree, cyber espionage is threatening to steal American wealth, American jobs and ultimately America’s economic security and the biggest aggressor is China. Due to the nature of the crime, the cost to American businesses is nearly impossible to pinpoint. Experts say Chinese hackers are constantly probing corporate networks, sifting through endless amounts of data to decipher what is valuable intellectual property, chemical formulas or proprietary technology. One conservative estimate from the National Counter Intelligence Executive puts the cost of economic espionage at up to $400B annually, but the report states such estimates vary “so widely as to be meaningless,” reflecting the scarcity of data available. CNBC’s David Faber and the Investigations Inc. team spoke with many corporate executives about China’s aggressive effort to target American businesses and their most valuable assets, but many refused to comment on camera for our report, citing becoming more vulnerable to attack by speaking publicly about the issue. However, not one executive denied their company is at risk of cyber-attack on a daily basis or the possibility of losing valuable intellectual property to cyber spies. Government and industry experts we spoke with on-camera have witnessed such costly cyber-attacks during their careers and attest to the fact there are only two companies left in America today: Those who know they’ve been hacked and those who don’t. From a whistleblower claiming telecommunications giant Nortel was one of the first casualties of this all-out cyber war, to high profile and public attacks on Google and RSA, its clear defending against cyber espionage is the new normal for American business.
  • Secrets, Lies, and Sweatshops

    Although American businesses claim to exploit "sweatshop" labor with on-site monitoring and strict codes of conduct, Chinese factories are hiding the abuse. The factories have been found to have two sets of books to fool the auditors and its employees are given written scripts in case they are questioned.
  • The Secret History of World War II

    A Boston Globe historical series provides an in-depth look into the intelligence machinations behind the World War II and the Cold War. The reporters reveal that Western Allies knew of Hitler's plans to systematically exterminate all of Europe's Jews several months earlier than previously thought; that US intelligence ran a covert operation to stall the creation of a Jewish state in the British colony of Palestine, fearing that such state would create generations of Islamic enmity; that American businesses were involved in commerce with the Nazis but also had espionage functions; and that the United States used 4,000 former German spies to spy on the Soviet Union. A major figure profiled in the series is a German Foreign Ministry official who had supplied the Americans with valuable inside documents but the CIA never really trusted him.
  • The Body Brokers

    An Orange County Register investigation of organ donations revealed that "American businesses make hundreds of millions of dollars selling products crafted from human bodies, even though it is illegal to profit from cadaver parts." The Register found that private businesses get around the law by establishing financial and other questionable links to nonprofit organ or tissue banks.