Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Arizona desert" ...

  • Dying to Get Back

    The death of Alfonso Martinez Sanchez, 39, in March 2012 sparked little attention. A construction worker and father of five who’d lived in Southern California for more than 20 years before being deported to Mexico, he was just another immigrant to die in the Arizona desert while attempting to cross back into the United States. But “Dying to Get Back,” a joint investigation by The Investigative Fund and PBS’s Need to Know, revealed that his death was part of a disturbing phenomenon: even as tighter border security has sent illegal border crossings plummeting, migrant deaths are on the rise — particularly among the deported parents of American children.
  • Careless Detention

    Four-part series on the medical treatment of immigrant detainees in the United States. Goldstein and Priest exposed the shoddy, unethical and, at times, fatal treatment of immigrants during their detentions and as they were being deported to their native countries. Their stories led readers deep inside America's network of immigration prisons--a world that had grown exponentially in the years since 9/11, yet remained largely unknown and hidden from view. Their stories documented the deaths of 83 detainees. And in one of the most stunning revelation, Goldstein and Priest disclosed the previously unreported scope of a practice of forcible sedation of immigrants with dangerous psychotropic drugs during deportation to their native countries; they found more than 250 instances in which the drugs were used on people with no history of psychiatric problems. Their stories also revealed that the most prevalent cause of death among the immigrant detainees is suicide, including the hangings of detainees known to be in such fragile mental health that they had been assigned suicide watchers. They profiled the slipshod treatment of an ailing Korean immigrant, a legal U.S. resident for three decades detained in a rail in the Arizona desert, with a history of recurrent cancer. And they documented the flawed medical practices, bureaucratic ineptitude, sloppy record-keeping and staff shortages that cause detainees who are sick to suffer and sometimes to die.
  • Mexico: A Death in the Desert

    LoMonaco and Spicuzza follow the story of Matias Garcia, a chili pepper farmer from Oaxaca, Mexico, who died in the Arizona desert after he crossed the border trying to find work. His family survived the journey, and in this story, they talk about their experience and the ordeals faced by thousands of other migrant workers.