Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Armed Forces" ...

  • America’s atomic vets: ‘We were used as guinea pigs – every one of us’

    Atomic veterans feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. In the decades since the nuclear tests, many have suffered ailments such as cancer and blame the radiation. https://www.retroreport.org/video/atomic-vets/ https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4481099eafd746ff8e79bb13a6596e79
  • A Losing Battle

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. We found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Our investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • A Losing Battle: How the Army denies veterans justice without anyone knowing

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. Fusion found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Their investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • The Columbus Dispatch: Credit Scars

    The Dispatch documented the plight of thousands who, through no fault of their own, have been denied the chance to buy a home or a car, take out a loan for college, rent an apartment, land a job, join the Armed Forces, receive medical care or even open a checking account.
  • Who Killed Doc?

    KSTP found that "commanders ignored warnings, botched investigations, and failed to protect service members on their own base - where they should have been the safest. As a result, the Armed Forces Medical Examiner says it has changed the way the remains of service members killed worldwide are tracked, to ensure that families of the fallen are notified of changes to their love one's autopsy or cause of death."
  • "Breach of Trust"

    Soldiers on all levels of the U.S. Armed Forces used fake college diplomas to increase chances of "promotions and pay raises." WHNT-TV revealed that several AMCOM employees had also presented "fake degrees" to the "Department of the Army." The investigation spurred a reconstruction of HR Specialist training, as the command's "ability to detect" to false diplomas was severely flawed.
  • How the VA Abandons Our Vets

    Sgt. Juan Jimenez was struck by a roadside bomb in Baghdad, and in need of immediate care, he sought disability benefits from the VA. He then learned of a bizarre regulation: before he could receive benefits he would have to prove his wounds came from war.
  • CSAR-X: Rescue Chopper Requirements Sacrificed for Schedule and Rivalries

    The U.S. Air Force violated its own procedures and guidelines to pick a new helicopter for its combat, search and rescue (CSAR-X) fleet. The Air Force chose an aircraft that did not meet the rescuer's requirements because it was settling old rivalries and arbitrary deadlines.
  • Military Gangs

    This story reveals the growing problem of military gangs in the U.S. Armed Forces. It focuses on a soldier who died after being beaten to death by fellow gang members in Germany.
  • Recruiters Sex

    For six months, the Associated Press investigated and found that "more than 100 young women were preyed upon sexually by their recruiters. Women were raped on recruiting office couches, assaulted in government cars and groped en route to entrance exams." The AP report said "more than 80 recruiters were disciplined" for this conduct. In addition, the Army, which makes up almost half of the U.S.' entire military, "has had 722 recruiters accused of rape and sexual misconduct since 1996." Those who are disciplined often receive a reduced rank and forfeited wages, but rarely face prosecution. Some of the cases did involve romantic relationships, which were sometimes initiated by the women.