Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Austin American-Statesman" ...

  • Austin American-Statesman: Unwatched

    Stories about children hurt or killed while in childcare pop up often enough that the Austin American-Statesman’s investigative team started to wonder: How safe are Texas child cares? The Statesman's investigative team dug into thousands of pages of state records, made more than 100 public information requests, and spoke with dozens of families, experts and state officials. We analyzed 40,000 day care violations and built a database showing that child care providers are often not paying attention when children get hurt and that hundreds of operations have been cited for failing to tell both parents and the state when children are hurt. We sought to give readers a comprehensive look at safety issues in the Texas day care system — a system that serves more than 1 million children every day.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Is Texas DPS skewing its border security stats - again?

    Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw went before Congress in April and touted nearly 40,000 arrests stemming from the department’s border surge of troopers in the Rio Grande Valley. The American-Statesman has long held DPS accountable when it comes to its border activities, and especially in how it has described the success of those efforts to lawmakers. With this story, we sought to continue in that watchdog role.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Inside Texas State's Year of Hate

    As a string of neo-Nazi and white supremacist propaganda attacks roiled the Texas State University campus in 2016 and 2017, the administration’s response baffled -- and angered -- many. But it wasn’t until the American-Statesman waged a months-long effort to obtain internal records related to the response that the public learned that university leaders several times chose damage control over action and struggled to form a coherent response or strategy.
  • Eight poles nationwide have fallen recently

    The Austin American-Statesman investigated more than a half-dozen instances of stadium light poles falling nationwide, most in the last six months, and tracked the failed light poles to a company in Texas.
  • Paid to Prosecute

    A joint Texas Tribune/Austin American-Statesman investigation revealed that the state's largest and oldest provider of workers’ compensation coverage — Texas Mutual Insurance — had paid millions of dollars to the Travis County District Attorney’s Office to get public prosecutors to pursue alleged crimes against the company. It was an enormous conflict of interest that had flown under the radar for more than a decade, a private justice system that gave special treatment to one insurer — and subjected many unsuspecting blue-collar workers to lawsuits.
  • State contracting scandal fallout

    In December of 2014, a high-ranking Texas health official resigned following weeks of questions by the Houston Chronicle and Austin American-Statesman about a $110 million no-bid contract. In the days and weeks after the resignation, the Houston Chronicle used sophisticated data analysis to show how the official had gotten away with egregiously stretching the rules of a $2 billion state purchasing program and to show how flaws in the program would make it easy for others to exploit it.
  • Writs Gone Wrong

    The Austin American-Statesman investigates as writs of habeas corpus are found to have errors when submitted to the court. These writs are essential in death row appeals because they "help ensure that the right person will be executed and that verdicts are obtained in accordance with the U.S. and state constitutions." But the newspaper found that "court appointed lawyers routinely submit shockingly botched writs applications. Some are incomplete, incomprehensible or improperly argued. Others are duplicated, poorly, from previous appeals." Yet, these lawyers are not held accountable for these mistakes.
  • The Secret World of the Texas Parole Board

    The Austin American-Statesman investigates the Texas Parole Board's controversial policy of holding its hearings behind closed doors. The three month investigation reveals the inner workings of "this mostly hidden part of the Texas public justice system".
  • More lottery tickets bought in low-income neighborhoods

    Far more lottery tickets are sold in low and middle income neighborhoods than in high-income areas, according to a computer-assisted study by the Austin American-Statesman. The American-Statesman finds that since the Texas lottery began in 1992, sales averaged 491 tickets per household in the poorest third of the state by 366 in per household in the richest third.
  • The Lost Children

    The Austin American-Statesman's five part series "provided the first definitive look at the hundreds of disabled and chronically ill children who are living in Texas nursing homes. The series gave compelling accounts of why they are there and under what conditions... examined scores of confidential government documents about abuse and neglect of children, reviewed nursing home inspection reports and other documents obtained through the Texas Open Records Act...