Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Baltimore Sun" ...

  • "Healthy Holly" and University of Maryland Medical System Investigation

    The “Healthy Holly” scandal began with a suggestion from a source, a state legislator who told Baltimore Sun reporter Luke Broadwater she thought there might be some irregular contracting practices going on at the University of Maryland Medical System. Broadwater, busy covering the General Assembly session, filed a public records request. The documents showed that Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh and other members of the hospital network’s board of directors had no-bid contracts with the medical system -- though the extent of those contracts, especially Pugh's, were not fully described. Broadwater's story -- written quickly as a daily as soon as he received the documents -- was breaking news that got the attention of Maryland's political establishment: University of Maryland Medical System pays members of volunteer board hundreds of thousands in business deals. Immediately, Broadwater and other Baltimore Sun reporters followed their instincts and tips that were coming in -- including that Pugh had failed to print many of the books she’d been paid to produce, while thousands of others were sitting unread in a Baltimore school system warehouse. Meanwhile, Sun reporters pulled ethics forms, poured over tax records, filed public information requests and worked sources, breaking story after story that exposed a widening scandal that rocked the state of Maryland, perhaps more than any other series of articles in decades. Their work led to the resignation of the mayor, the UMMS CEO and other top officials, including every member of the medical system's board of directors.
  • Baltimore Sun: University of Maryland football scandal

    University of Maryland offensive lineman Jordan McNair died of heatstroke in June, weeks after he collapsed during football practice. His death sent shockwaves through the university community, eventually causing the president to be forced out, the football coach to be fired and the board of regents chairman to resign. We strove to investigate the circumstances of the student's death and how the university handled the subsequent fallout.
  • Baltimore Sun: The Baltimore Police Gun Trace Task Force Scandal

    The Baltimore Sun’s coverage of arguably the biggest corruption scandal in the history of the Baltimore Police Department continued into 2018, with the trials of the remaining officers charged in the federal case and the fallout from the case. The Sun produced work that revealed the suburban drug case that led authorities to the rogue squad, how the convictions thrust into question thousands of open and adjudicated cases involving the officers and what the trials revealed about the deep reach of the city’s drug economy.
  • The death of Korryn Gaines

    These stories explored the death of Korryn Gaines after a six-hour standoff with Baltimore County police. Baltimore Sun reporters were able to shed light on the incident with stories about Gaines’ past encounters with police and social media postings, an exclusive interview with the neighbor who allowed police to drill holes in the wall he shared with Gaines’ apartment so they could monitor her movements, and another exclusive on court documents showing that police sought Gaines’ private Facebook messages and other account information. Reporters also explored other angles, such as the role social media is playing in encounters with police across the country. Finally, reporters gained exclusive access to the investigative file that provided a trove of information on how the standoff went down.
  • Shoot to Kill

    With no dependable, uniform data on gun violence, it’s impossible to get even a simple tally of the number of shootings in the United States. So Baltimore Sun reporter George and Marquette University students, as part of the O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, spent months trying to understand how many people are shot and how often they survive. What they found is that the odds of survival for gunshot victims were getting worse in at least 10 of the nation’s largest cities, including Baltimore, New York and Chicago.
  • The 45-minute mystery of Freddie Gray's death

    In the days after Freddie Gray died — and with the nation’s attention focused on Baltimore — many questions remained about his arrest and ride in a police transport van. The Baltimore Sun sought to answer those questions, by re-creating the crucial minutes during which Gray sustained a severe and ultimately fatal spinal injury. Reporters hit the streets of West Baltimore, beginning at the spot of Gray’s arrest on April 12. They used video to highlight key intersections and give viewers a look at the neighborhood, and interviewed residents and business owners whose accounts raised questions about the official version of events, including a police account that Gray was arrested "without force or incident." The reporters also revealed that police investigators had missed important evidence. Sun designers used this material to create a video timeline highlighting key moments from the “45-minute mystery,” distilling in-depth reporting that would become a 2,200-word story into a dynamic, six-slide interactive, which succinctly and dramatically laid out the disparities between the police and residents’ accounts of Gray’s much-discussed arrest and van ride. http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • The death of Freddie Gray

    The April death of a West Baltimore man in police custody quickly spiraled into a controversy that left some city neighborhoods in flames, and brought attention from national and international media. Within days, the name Freddie Gray became associated with the broader debate over the way police across the nation treated African-Americans. Central to that debate was a singular question: How did Gray die? The Baltimore Sun set out to provide an answer by investigating allegations of police brutality and dissecting the crucial minutes after Gray was arrested. Reporters revealed that Gray was not the first person to be seriously injured in a police transport van, and that officers routinely ignored calls by detainees for medical care. http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/police-convictions/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/news/intake-logs/rejections/ http://data.baltimoresun.com/freddie-gray/
  • Veterans Disability Claims

    Yvonne Wenger’s story for The Baltimore Sun examined the disability claims backlog at the Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Through her reporting and use of an online database, she discovered that the Baltimore office, which services all of Maryland, had the worst backlog in the country and made the most mistakes. Servicemen and women in Maryland were waiting an average of 12 months for an initial decision about benefits; in some cases, it could take years more to receive the payments. Yvonne reached out to dozens of veterans but found that all were fearful to speak to a reporter because they thought doing so would affect their claims. She eventually did find a combat veteran, Robert Fearing, who was willing to be interviewed. He was suffering from paranoia and anxiety and had been waiting 2 ½ years for the Baltimore office to make a decision about his claim. After publication of the article, reaction from Maryland’s congressional delegation was swift. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin both took action to seek changes locally and nationally to address the backlog. And just days after the article was published, Fearing had his claim reviewed and approved.
  • Maryland's Failed Health Exchange

    Baltimore Sun reporters Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn investigated what contributed to Maryland's troubled roll-out of its state-run health insurance marketplace. Emails between state officials and contractors as well as court documents revealed infighting and ineffectual oversight hampered efforts to launch and repair the state health care exchange.
  • Military Sexual Assaults

    The Baltimore Sun explored the little covered issue of sexual assault of men in the military, finding that justice is rarely sought in those cases even though statistics show that more men than women in the military are sexually assaulted each year.