Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Banking" ...

  • North Bay Bohemian: Sonoma Trifecta

    The three interlocking stories uncovered a real estate investor-banking-media network that illuminates the shape of Sonoma County’s “shadow” government. A development partnership angling for a county contract includes a county official who partners with a banker who flaunts ethics regulations in a fire disaster rebuild area. An owner of a major local newspaper is a board member of the bank which receives favorable press coverage in the newspaper for its fire deals that do not disclose the ownership connection. Another owner of the newspaper, a real estate investor and political consultant, is found to have defrauded a local Indian tribe in a real estate deal and in cahoots with the son of a U.S. Senator. As we go to press, the newspaper fails to report on the fraud when confronted with the relevant court documents, publishing only a 900 word story on a “dispute” that our 3,500 story unveils as fraud and breach of contract. The need for surviving alt-weeklies to keep publishing hard-hitting LOCAL investigative journalism is reaffirmed.
  • ‘Banking On Failing:’ Opiate Addiction & The Insurance Struggle

    As Wisconsin’s heroin and opiate painkiller overdoses hit epidemic levels, desperate parents say the current insurance system, which they are depending on to help them save their addicted children's lives, is instead banking on their children's failure. https://vimeo.com/matthewsimonjournalist/review/146988583/89d839bc07 https://vimeo.com/matthewsimonjournalist/review/146988570/e9716e1e80
  • Treasury's Bankers

    A government program aimed at saving money by eliminating paper benefits checks is hurting millions of vulnerable citizens. As they face confusion, high fees and poor customer service, the bank that issues a government-backed debit card is collecting millions in fees charged to consumers and millions more from the government, according to the Center for Public Integrity investigation, "Treasury's Bankers." After the report, the Treasury Department agreed to open the debit card contract for new bids.
  • Incapacitated: Florida's Guardianship Program

    The ABC Action News I-Team took an in-depth look at issues surrounding Florida’s court-ordered guardianship program. Once people are determined to be incapacitated by the court, they are stripped of their rights (including those to vote, to marry, to have a job, to drive, to choose their place of residence, to make gifts, to manage finances and to choose their health care providers). Guardians can bill their wards up to $70 an hour for performing routine tasks like opening mail, banking and paying them visits. There is no limit on the number of wards a guardian can be assigned. We found cases in which guardians were appointed dozens of wards at one time. We also discovered a lack of systemic oversight and a system that allowed abuse. Families of wards reported valuable items like jewelry and antiques often went missing. Records showed wards were often frequently moved from one assisted living home to another without their families being notified. Their homes, personal property and vehicles were often sold for a small percentage of their actual worth, and then resold by the guardians’ friends who purchased these items for huge profits.
  • Operation Red Spider

    A Cobrapost pan-India undercover investigation spanning several months, unearths a vast, nation-wide money laundering racket being run by private & government sector banks. The brazen criminal activity of these banks is exposed as they channelize vast amounts of black money into the regular banking system as laundered white money.
  • Understanding Libor

    The Financial Times was quick to realize the broad implications of a worldwide investigation by regulators into Libor – the London interbank offered rate – and throughout 2012, pursued the probe into the possible manipulation of benchmark interest rates as a pivotal and challenging reporting opportunity. The FT realized that Libor was a pivotal underpinning to the global financial system. Allegations of corruption by banks or individuals in rigging Libor could expose grave flaws in the banking and raise questions about the need for structural and cultural reform. The FT, a global news organization, focused a sizable staff in its bureaus in New York, London, Washington, Tokyo, Brussels and Zurich on tracking revelations in the case, finding traders linked to the probe and sourcing regulators in more than ten agencies across the globe who were involved in the inquiry. Beat reporters Kara Scannell and Brooke Masters, in New York and London respectively, had spent months in 2010 and 2011 digging into Libor allegations; by September 2011, the FT published the first story about a possible criminal probe. By early 2012, the Financial Times was poised to own the story and did throughout the year – breaking news, illuminating how banks and traders could make money in small changes in the rate and creating innovative online resources, databases, videos and podcasts on a daily and weekly basis to keep the story fresh and original. Its coverage was relentless, ahead-of-the-curve and visionary. Its digital story telling – and its interactive graphic “Understanding Libor” – was superior in helping readers understand this complex story.
  • Understanding Libor

    The Financial Times was quick to realize the broad implications of a worldwide investigation by regulators into Libor – the London interbank offered rate – and throughout 2012, pursued the probe into the possible manipulation of benchmark interest rates as a pivotal and challenging reporting opportunity. The FT realized that Libor was a pivotal underpinning to the global financial system. Allegations of corruption by banks or individuals in rigging Libor could expose grave flaws in the banking and raise questions about the need for structural and cultural reform. The FT, a global news organization, focused a sizable staff in its bureaus in New York, London, Washington, Tokyo, Brussels and Zurich on tracking revelations in the case, finding traders linked to the probe and sourcing regulators in more than ten agencies across the globe who were involved in the inquiry. Beat reporters Kara Scannell and Brooke Masters, in New York and London respectively, had spent months in 2010 and 2011 digging into Libor allegations; by September 2011, the FT published the first story about a possible criminal probe. By early 2012, the Financial Times was poised to own the story and did throughout the year – breaking news, illuminating how banks and traders could make money in small changes in the rate and creating innovative online resources, databases, videos and podcasts on a daily and weekly basis to keep the story fresh and original. Its coverage was relentless, ahead-of-the-curve and visionary. Its digital story telling – and its interactive graphic “Understanding Libor” – was superior in helping readers understand this complex story.
  • The Fed's Trillion-Dollar Secret

    "Bloomberg News sued the Federal Reserve under the FOI Act, seeking disclosure of its loans to banks during the financial crisis. The central bank fought the release of the data for more than two years, during which time congress and the courts both weighed in on Bloomberg's side."
  • "A Crack in the Swiss Vault"

    This investigative story takes an in-depth look into offshore banking, specifically in Switzerland. Bradley Birkenfeld is an American citizen serving extensive prison time for revealing to the U.S. Government that "he and his colleagues" had been secretly helping their "American customers evade hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes" through private banking divisions in Geneva.
  • The Fight for Transparency

    "Bloomberg is the only news organization ever to sue the Federal Reserve Board-and win, forcing disclosure of borrowers and collateral for emergency bailout money." They are forcing the Reserve Board's accountability by providing accurate numbers to the public. Also, the information on the subject is now available to every major news organization in the US.