Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Boston Marathon" ...

  • 108 Hours: Inside the Hunt for the Boston Marathon Bombers

    As the one-year anniversary of the bombings approached, Brian Williams and a team of producers, crews and editors set out to produce an in-depth look at the attack, using a unique frame: the 108 hours that elapsed between the start of the race and the capture of the second suspect. Our program aired April 11, 2014 and was the culmination enterprise journalism. The program examined the actual hunt for the suspects through the eyes, and in some cases the gun sights, of those directly involved in the manhunt.
  • Terror in Boston

    When terror struck at the Boston marathon, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Team raced to the scene and stayed for weeks, uncovering exclusive details and providing round-the-clock coverage surrounding the plot that tragically took the lives of three innocent people and brought the city of Boston to a standstill for five days. In a series of 17 stories in the week following the explosions, and a total of 35 aired television investigative reports in the month afterwards, Ross and his team reported on every ABC News platform and breaking news report. The team was the first to report that pressure cookers and components of toy remote control cars were used to construct the bombs, intimate details about what bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote right before he was captured, and new leads in the investigation, including a photo of the suspects taken inside a Lord & Taylor department store. Throughout this coverage, the ABC News Investigative Team worked diligently to fact check every detail in this fast-moving investigation. While other news organizations chose to air photos of two potential suspects early on that would then prove not to be correct or in any way connected to the bombing, ABC News chose accuracy over speed, fact-checking over error, resulting in coverage that broke numerous headlines and provided ABC News viewers and readers with up-to-the-moment details and exclusive investigative insight.
  • Explosion at West

    Tons of ammonium nitrate fertilizer at a central Texas plant exploded last April with the force of a small earthquake. The blast came just two days after the Boston Marathon and, in the national media, was overshadowed by events in the Northeast. While not the result of a terrorist attack, the explosion in West, Texas, was far larger and deadlier, and raised more significant public safety issues. In a series of investigative reports over eight months, The Dallas Morning News revealed that ammonium nitrate remains virtually unregulated by federal and state governments, despite its well-known explosive potential. (Timothy McVeigh used it in 1995 to blow up an Oklahoma City federal building.) Efforts to strengthen oversight have been blocked by industry lobbyists and government gridlock, The News found, even as the Pentagon sought bans on ammonium nitrate in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In pro-business, anti-regulation Texas, the federal government’s lax oversight meant no oversight at all. West Fertilizer Co. – scene of the disaster – violated almost every safety best practice. No state agency was charged with preventing an ammonium nitrate blast. There was no public registry of companies that handled the compound, even though many facilities are near homes and schools. Texas prohibits most counties from having fire codes and does not require facilities like West to obtain liability insurance. Gov. Rick Perry and other state politicians, who created this wide-open environment, washed their hands of the problem. They said West was a tragic accident that no amount of regulation could have prevented. The News’ findings, however, proved otherwise.