Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "CBC News" ...

  • School Violence

    A young woman sexually assaulted, a grade-nine student “jumped” from behind, kicked in the head and left unconscious, another beaten in the hallway while students watched and recorded on their phones, Indigenous elementary students chased and in fear, a black student repeatedly attacked, called names and physically assaulted. All of these students bravely came forward, seeking help from those who are supposed to protect them - their teachers, principals and coaches. School should feel safe but for these students and thousands of others, school didn't feel safe anymore. Gaining the trust of these young people and telling their stories in a meaningful, empowering way became our goal. CBC’s months-long investigation also took a data-driven approach to document what many called a rise of violence in Canada’s schools. We gave a voice to more than 4,000 students through a groundbreaking survey while documenting a shocking lack of reporting, countrywide.
  • CBC News - Missing and Murdered: Finding Cleo

    This submission is for a podcast with ten episodes. The submission includes the episodes, an audio trailer as well as a link to the podcast website where you can find other material such as photos and video and text stories and uploaded files of the episode transcripts (as supplementary material) On the surface, this is a true crime story trying to answer the question - what happened to Cleo Semaganis Nicotine? She and her siblings in the Cree Indigenous family were taken into government care in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1970's and adopted into white families in Canada and the United States. The siblings re-connected as adults but can't find Cleo. They've heard that she ran away from a home in Arkansas and was murdered but they don't know if that is true. They want help to at least find where she is buried.
  • Rail Crossings Danger

    A CBC News investigation into Canada's top 25 most accident-prone railway crossings found wide-spread design flaws across the country. Some of the most dangerous railway crossings in Canada lack automated gate arms, protective pedestrian gates, advance warning signs, bells and flashing lights. Other deficiencies include poor sightlines for drivers, confusing road signs and overgrown bush. As well, CBC News learned Transport Canada does not routinely warn the public about all railway crossings that appear in its database of the country's 500 "highest risk" crossings.
  • Getting Away with Murder

    A six-month investigation by CBC News revealed that "65 young men were killed in a gang war that started in 1990 and was escalating." Until then, police had said there were 50 gang-related murders, most of them unsolved. By building a database, CBC News discovered that many of the killings were linked "in a complex web of revenge, retaliation and contract killings."
  • Seifert: Beat of Bolzano

    CBC News investigates Michael Seifert, a Vancouver man charged with war crimes in Italy during World War II. Seifert has so far managed to avoid being deported to Italy to stand trial for the crimes that happened fifty years ago, including murder, rape and torture.
  • Legault

    CBC News investigates the case of Alex Legault, an American fugitive living in Montreal. Wanted for fraud in Florida, Texas and Louisiana, Legault has fought extradition for 18 years. Legault's companies are also under investigation for fraud.
  • Poisoned on the Job

    CBC News reports "a story about transit workers in the small Alberta city of Medicine Hat who say they are sick because they were exposed to dangerous levels of methanol during a federally funded test project of the alternative fuel. Methyl alcohol is highly toxic, but the workers were told it was 'environmentally friendly.' A report from an internal investigation confirmed the workers were exposed to excessive levels of the chemical for years as they worked in clothes soaked with the fuel and breathed formaldehyde fumes produced by incomplete combustion. Today, the workers say they suffer from chemical sensitivities because of their exposure. Alberta's Workers' Compensation Board has rejected their claims...."