Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Chemicals" ...

  • Gulf War Illness

    The Hartford Courant investigates allegations from Persian Gulf War veterans that they were exposed to chemicals that caused widespread sickness. The Courant finds that not only are the veterans not getting help from the Department of Defense, but department doctors have diagnosed the veterans with mental diseases.
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    The Riverfront Times investigates the coordinated attempt by the EPA, Missouri Department of Natural Resources and Agribusiness Technologies Inc. to clean up dioxin contamination in Times Beach, Mo. and other sites in Southwest Missouri. In order to implement the cleanup effort, the federal government has imposed an unsafe incinerator on the St. Louis community which may lead to more contamination in surrounding areas. (May 18, 1994 - Nov. 20, 1996)
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    World Watch investigates the expanding global economy and looks at a growing range of black markets in illicit drugs, weapons, endangered wildlife, toxic waste or ozone-depleting chemicals. These black market activities along with other grey market activities often go unnoticed but threaten the world's stable governments and institutions. (July - Aug. 1996)
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    When her brother and sister both got cancer, she became suspicious. When she learned many more people who lived near the landfill were sick, she became obsessed. Philadelphia Magazine looks at Robin Wilson's crusade to uncover the horrifying effects of the more than 3 million gallons of toxic liquid waste and 12,000 cubic yard of toxic solid waste dumped into Pittman, N.J.'s Alcyon Lake between 1957 and 1971. (July 1996)
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    What kind of man would spend nearly two decades bombing innocent people he didn't know? In Ted Kaczynski, the Feds believe they have found an eccentric Montana loner who may fit the profile of the notorious Unabomber. Newsweek reports on the longest investigation in FBI history and the eventually capture of Kaczynski. (April 15, 1996)
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    In the long run, using chemical weapons against weeds and bugs is a losing proposition. World Watch evaluates the effectiveness of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) to minimize pest use while still increasing production. While the story reports success for many IPM-trained farmers World Watch also discovered some farmers claim to be practicing IPM simply by rotating pesticides. (March/April 1996)
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    Audubon examines the plight of the Swainson's hawk. The birds migrate from the United States and Canada to Argentina in the winters. Thousands of birds have perished in recent years due to exposure to acutely toxic chemicals that Argentine farmers use to kill grasshoppers, the hawk's prey. It is estimated that 5 percent of the hawk population perished in one season. (September - October, 1996)
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    When soil at an old cannery building began to smolder, investigators learned that decomposing cannery byproducts buried in the soil, like peach and apricot pits and asparagus ends, had produced flammable, toxic chemicals, including hydrogen cyanide and methane. The Ledger Dispatch examines the environmental and financial risks involved in the situation. (August 6, 1995)
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    This Houston Chronicle report examines the Superfund law, claiming that it has gotten little or nothing done since its inception in 1980 and how it is now facing fierce opposition from outraged industry groups and an openly hostile Congress. (Fall, 1995)
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    After nearly three years of work and $19 million, the former White Chemical Plant in Newark still looks like a toxic waste site, one of the 107 in New Jersey that were supposed to be cleaned up under the ambitious federal Superfund program. This is just one of the Star-Ledger's examples of the mixture of litigation, bureaucracy and environmental zealotry that has poisoned the program. ( May, 1996)