Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Chemicals" ...

  • Dangerous Exposure

    Toxic chemicals seeping from industrial sites across the State of Indiana are contaminating neighborhoods and putting families at risk of dangerous exposure. 13 Investigates discovered most Indiana homeowners are in the dark about toxins lurking below the ground or in the air. The companies responsible for the contamination promised to clean up their messes as part of a voluntary program offered by the State. In exchange, the state provides participating companies legal immunity from getting sued, but 13 Investigates discovered major breakdowns in accountability. Companies hiding out in the program for decades failed to clean up as promised. At the same time Indiana's top environmental watchdog agency failed to enforce the rules to keep homeowners safe. 13 Investigates Reporter Sandra Chapman uncovers what's hidden, presses for answers and finally gets government admissions that the State simply lost track of some sites and poorly managed others. In response the state created new directives to prevent stalled cleanups from exposing neighborhoods to toxic threats. http://youtu.be/cbACoNGvHMU http://www.wthr.com/tags/dangerous-exposures
  • Potter County, Pennsylvania: Private & Public Drinking Water Sources Contamination by Illegal Chemicals

    Public Herald broke the story about groundwater and surface water contamination from drilling operations by JKLM Energy in Potter County that impacted private and public water supplies. Since our first breaking report, we have been contacted by residents who informed us that they were not notified that the local groundwater had been contaminated, continued to use their water and experience stomach and digestive pain and discomfort. County officials applaud the industry for being "responsible" despite illegal operations and a refusal by the company to release a full list of chemicals that contaminated water sources.
  • Sonora River: Massive mine spill continues impact to Sonora River Basin

    One year after the Buenavista del Cobre copper mine spilled 11 million gallons of toxic chemicals into the Sonora River in Mexico, polluting nearly 200 miles of river and threatening the health and livelihood of its residents, the Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting highlighted the consequences of an inadequate government response and illegal operations at the mine that led to the spill. Deep reporting illuminates farmers and families still sick from contact with the contaminated water, a government slow to take meaningful action to protect its residents and outdated water quality standards that allow 2.5 times more arsenic than acceptable international norms. https://soundcloud.com/bquester/azcir-sonora-river-radio-preview-with-kpbs
  • Lumber Liquidators

    After a seven-month investigation, 60 MINUTES found that Chinese-made laminate flooring sold in Lumber Liquidator outlets across the country contains amounts of toxic formaldehyde that may not meet health and safety standards. http://youtu.be/f-i8PmX_f4k http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/lumber-liquidators-update-2/
  • Noncompliant Hazardous Waste Facility

    A facility that handles hazardous wastes - including chemicals from auto repair shops, industrial plants and paint stores - before they're moved to permanent disposal sites has operated without a permit because of failures of the city and the company's owners.
  • Exxon Mobil's Near Miss

    CBS News exposes a near miss at an Exxon Mobil refinery in Southern California that could have put 200,000 people at risk. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/149886751/86f4329ecd
  • Synthetics & The New Drug War

    NBC Washington created the most comprehensive site available anywhere on the Internet about synthetic drugs following a record-breaking year in the DC region for overdoses and violent crimes connected to these ever-changing chemical cocktails. While the rest of the nation grappled with the opioid epidemic, EMS crews in our region responded to 10x as many emergency calls for synthetic overdoses compared to heroin overdoses, heart attacks and strokes this year. By combining ten different investigations with multiple interactive features, including the first-of-its kind "synthetic drug dictionary," NBC Washington helped parents, teachers, policy makers and the police themselves understand how dangerous these drugs really are and why law enforcement just can't seem to catch up in this new drug war. http://data.nbcstations.com/national/DC/synthetic-drugs/
  • In These Times: Why the United States Leaves Deadly Chemicals on the Market

    We investigated the numerous ways the chemical industry influences regulation of chemicals by the EPA and the FDA. Specifically, we discovered that industry-funded researchers have used a particular type of scientific study called “physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling” to support industry claims that economically important chemicals are safe. We found that the scientists who pioneered PBPK modeling while working for the Air Force in the early 1980s had recognized early on that PBPK studies could be used to industry’s advantage. As we examined the record over the past four decades, it became clear that these studies are primarily conducted by regulatory toxicologists working as private consultants or for research institutions funded by chemical companies. Further, these same individuals and consultancies often receive federal grants and contracts, suggesting widespread conflicts of interest. Our investigation documents the outcome – often delay or outright termination – of regulatory processes for numerous hazardous chemicals, including methylene chloride, formaldehyde, bisphenol A, perchlorate, styrene, and chlorpyrifos. While other journalists have documented the chemical industry’s political influence, to our knowledge no other journalists have brought to light the ways science itself is being manipulated.
  • The Oregonian/OregonLive's "A Tainted High"

    The Oregonian/OregonLive bought medical marijuana that had purportedly passed pesticide tests and sent the samples to two independent labs for further analysis. The results were shocking: Nearly all of the marijuana purchased at Portland dispensaries was loaded with chemicals – including the active compound in Raid and other household roach killers. http://www.oregonlive.com/marijuana-legalization/pesticides/index.html
  • LA's Nuclear Secret / KNBC-TV Los Angeles

    A yearlong investigation by KNBC-TV revealed that dangerous radioactive materials were secretly released into the air above Los Angeles for years, and the government has covered it up. This I-Team investigation exposes the once-secret nuclear experiments at the Santa Susana Field Lab, tucked away in the hills between the San Fernando and Simi valleys. We found evidence that these radioactive releases, and the mishandling of toxic chemicals at the Field Lab, might be responsible for thousands of illnesses and deaths. https://vimeo.com/150828999 http://data.nbcstations.com/national/KNBC/la-nuclear-secret/