Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "Clery Act" ...

  • The Hidden Victims of Campus Sexual assault: Students with Disabilities

    Reporter Azmat Khan spent more than six months investigating the challenges students with disabilities can face when it comes to sexual assault at Gallaudet University, the country’s most renowned school for students with disabilities. It also happens to have the highest rate of “forcible sex offenses” — crime statistics required by the federal Clery Act — of any federally funded university in 2012.
  • Clery Act Challenges -- Many schools continue to struggle with law or fail to follow guidelines

    This story focused broadly on university compliance with the Clery Act, a federal campus safety law first enacted in the aftermath of a Lehigh University student's murder more than 25 years ago. While schools are expected to be diligent in disclosing campus crime statistics, many institutions do not devote significant manpower to overseeing Clery Act compliance and the intricacies of the law can be a source of confusion.
  • Off Campus Crime

    While the Clery Act requires Texas universities to report on campus crime, they are not required to report any off campus crime that affects their students. The numbers were staggering and showed a clear difference in the safety of students on campus versus off.
  • "Sexual Assault on Campus: A Frustrating Search for Justice"

    Unfortunately, sexual assault occurs on campuses all over the U.S. For the small number of those who come forward to report the act, institutional policies can often make the process toward accountability difficult, sometimes even causing the victim to drop the claim. The Center for Public Integrity finds that most university policies are lacking in "transparency" and often lead to less the harsh punishment for the accused attackers.
  • Insecurity on Campus

    As reported by two teams of journalism students at Southern Methodist University and Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas, many colleges were failing to inform students about violent crimes-such as rape-in and around their campuses. Also, many campuses were misinterpreting or ignoring the Clery Act, which requires disclosure of campus-related crimes. Many rapes were ignored or were logged as simple 'assaults'. As a result, U.S. Department of Education launched an investigation into the story's findings.
  • Campus crime

    This WMAR investigation into the amount of crime on Maryland college campuses was prompted by the stabbing death of a Johns Hopkins University student while he slept in his dorm. The TV station wanted to take a more in-depth look into campus crime, so it analyzed data from the U.S. Department of Education's Clery Act to determine a rate of crime at state college campuses. The investigation also showed footage of campus crimes after a series of challenging negotiations with some college campuses to release surveillance video under state open records laws.
  • UC keeps sex crimes in shadows

    A five-month Bee investigation finds that "reports of rapes and sexual assaults at University of California campuses are seldom made public each year despite a decade-old federal law created to force colleges to do so." Bee reporters found that several UC campuses violated the federal campus crime reporting law, called the Clery Act. "The result: annual crime reports provided to students and parents that create a misleading portrayal of safety at UC campuses." While the nine UC campuses reported 60 forcible sex offenses in 1998, including rapes, the Bee discovered "at least 190 cases of rape and forcible sex offenses...The figure is by no means comprehensive." UC Irvine and UC Riverside sidestepped the more stringent reporting requirements of the Clery Act by using FBI statistics.