Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Delta" ...

  • BuzzFeed News: American Mercenaries

    This was an 8-month investigation that uncovered a privately-run assassination program in Yemen run by American Special Operations veterans and reservists working as mercenaries. Hired by the United Arab Emirates, Americans were sent to kill civilian political leaders from an Islamist party. The team, paid millions of dollars, was made up of about a dozen veterans from the most combat-skilled units America has: former SEALS, former Delta Force, and even former CIA ground branch. It was led by a charismatic former French Foreign Legionnaire who lives in the US suburbs.
  • Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command

    Relentless Strike is the first full-length history of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), the secret military organization that, away from the public eye, has become the military’s main effort in the wars of the 21st century. JSOC runs many of the United States’ most sensitive missions and commands its most secret “special mission units,” including SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and the even more secret “Army of Northern Virginia.” The book contains dozens of scoops and sheds new light on every period of JSOC’s history and virtually every major mission it has conducted. http://www.amazon.com/Relentless-Strike-History-Special-Operations/dp/1250014549/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1452551893&sr=1-1&keywords=Relentless+Strike
  • Broken Justice in Phillips County

    A five-part series preceded by an initial investigation into dysfunction in the criminal justice system in an Arkansas Delta county known for corruption and poverty. The year-long investigation uncovered errors and archaic practices in the handling of fugitive warrants and speedy trials that allowed felony suspects to remain free for years without fear of answering to the charges against them. As a result, prosecutors had to drop hundreds of cases for failure to take them to trial in a timely manner. Since publication, the Phillips County sheriff has made changes in how his office handles failure-to-appear warrants, and court officials have reduced case backlogs. Nevertheless, problems persist.
  • A My Lai a Month

    "These articles chronicle the mass slaughter of civilians- up to 5,000 according to one U.S. official- by U.S. 9th Infantry Division troops in Vietnam's Mekong Delta during Operation Speedy Express, which lasted from December 1968 through May 1969."
  • Losing Louisiana

    The Times-Picayune found that over the next 100 years the natural sinking of soft marsh soils could result in making New Orleans an island. Hundreds of miles of Louisiana coastline would be wiped out and sea-level will rise over time as the soil falls.
  • Captain WOW: When is Mental State Of a Pilot Grounds for Grounding Him?

    The Wall Street Journal reports on the case of a pilot, Capt. Witter, diagnosed with personal disorder. "The Witter case, offering a look inside the normally closed world of the cockpit shows just how difficult it can be to decide whether a pilot is mentally fit to fly. Of 5.066 pilot groundings for medical reasons in the past two years, 915 involved psychological or psychiatric disorders."
  • Airport security: Years of inaction left flawed system to fail

    A Kansas City Star investigative packet examines lapses in aviation security, which allowed for the Sept. 11 terrorist attack to occur. Airlines have always fought against draft legislation for raising minimum security standards, the Star reports, in order to keep their attractiveness to customers and profit margins. One of the stories reveals that airlines have regularly sent congressmen on vacation and 'educational' trips for free, in exchange for favorable legislation. Despite constant warnings by the General Accounting Office, not only the Congress, but also the FAA failed to enforce rules to tighten airport security. Some of the findings are that screeners sometimes turned out to be felons, and bags were not scanned for bombs. The investigation focuses on problems detected specifically at the Kansas City International Airport, the nation's 35th busiest airport.
  • The Delta Initiatives: a threadbare legacy

    Since 1991 the government has poured more than $200 billion into the impovrished Mississippi River Delta, but programs have "failed to acheive their ambition goals," Jeff Porter reports. Goals set for reducing teen pregnancy to match the national average, providing accesss to adequate water, sewage disposal, fire protection and economically stabilizing minority and small family farms, were not met. The articles examine successes and faliures in small towns in the Delta.
  • The Killing Fields

    In fuel-rich Nigeria, the people and the environment pay for the harvest of gas and oil. Of the most deadly consequences are explosions brought on by leaking gas pipelines, sometimes sabotaged by Nigerians looking for gas to sell on the black market. Oil spills have also devastated certain communities with their polluted aftermath.
  • Some Airlines Mishandle Food, Sewage Disposal

    "Some of the country's biggest airlines and in-flight caterers have violated federal health regulations of food storage and sewage handling, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration records. So far this year, the agency has sent six 'warning letters' about violations to carriers including Northwest Airlines, Delta Air Lines, AMR Corp.'s American Airlines and Continental Airlines - twice the number send during the same period in 1997." Trains and buses are also discussed.