Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Disney" ...

  • Offshore Secrets

    The Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) sparked public outrage and government action throughout 2014 by exposing secret tax deals and offshore holdings involving a multitude of powerful players in the U.S. and beyond – including Pepsi, Disney, FedEx and other mega-corporations; Communist China’s political and financial elite; a top U.K. government minister; even the president of the Republic of Seychelles.
  • Theme Parks Investigation

    At least 35 Walt Disney World employees have been arrested since 2006 and accused of sex crimes involving children, trying to meet a minor for sex, or for possession of child pornography, according to a six-month CNN investigation that examined police and court records, and interviewed law enforcement officials and some of the men who have been arrested.
  • Blood In The Streets

    The Orlando metropolitan region is a classic example of late 20th century-sprawl, lacking in comprehensive urban planning and built around available roads. The metropolis experienced explosive growth following the founding of Walt Disney World (1971), SeaWorld Orlando (1973) and Universal Orlando (1988.) Government agencies responded to the growing population's transportation needs primarily by making the existing roads wider and faster. By the 21st century it became apparent that pedestrians were never a significant part of the planning. It became apparent because so many of them were getting run down and killed, even though most people, it seemed, avoided walking. By almost all accounts Orlando had become the most dangerous city in the country for pedestrians. The Orlando Sentinel set out to explore the plight of pedestrians and the drivers who hit them, telling the stories of those killed or seriously injured, those who had to live with it, and the public institutions - the road agencies, police, hospitals and courts - that, ultimately, coped ineffectively with the carnage. To do so, we carefully analyzed highway patrol data on thousands of crashes and reviewed full crash investigation reports and court files on scores of them. We tracked down survivors, victims' families and drivers. And we used their stories (backed by volumes of data) to show how dangerous walking in Orlando had become.
  • Someone Has To Die Tonight

    The Lords of Chaos, a group of teenage boys on Ft. Myers, FL, went on a crime spree that ended with the murder of a high school band director. Their crimes included theft, vandalism and blowing up a Coca-Cola building. They even planned, but never had a chance to commit, a racially-motivated mass murder at Walt Disney World. As author Jim Greenhill conducted interviews and got to know the group's ringleader on Death Row, the ringleader and his mother asked the author to arrange the murders of three witnesses. Greenhill delves into how these young boys went so horribly bad.
  • Pulling G's

    This investigation looks at the G forces riders experience on thrill rides at central Florida theme parks. The parks have resisted releasing such information, so Florida Today measured them, developing data using a 3-axis accelerometer. Despite much concern, the rides were within established safety limits.
  • International Drive: Tourism's Main Street; I-Drive: How it Grew; I-Drive: Set to Boom

    This series of stories traces the development of Orlando's International Drive, where attractions, restaurants, gift-stores and hotels crowd together to lure in tourists. After examining the history of International Drive, Leusner recognizes that the strip's heyday has past. He talks to business owners and developers to make predictions about the area's future.
  • Corporate governance: The best and worst boards

    Business Week surveys Wall Street's biggest investors and most prominence government experts to determine the best and worst boards of directors nationwide. The survey finds consistency with results from previous years: GE, IBM, Home Depot, Intel, Cisco Systems, Compaq an Campbell rank among the top ones; Walt Disney, Archer Daniels Midland. Advanced Micro Devices, Rite Aid and Cendant are at the bottom. Accounting scandals are often a major cause for underperformance.
  • 2002 IRE National Conference Show and Tell Tape #2

    2002 IRE National Conference (San Francisco) Show and Tell Tape #2 features the following stories 1) Tim Minton (WNBC-New York City) Security at local hospitals are lacking. 2) Brian Collister (KMOL-San Antonio) An inordinate number of court case have been thrown out of the local county court because judges ruled the defendants lacked a speedy trial. 3) Clips from a PBS project concerning scientists' genetic experiments. 4) Kevin Quinn (KFSN-Fresno) Area residents are suspicious of a local Muslim village called Baladullah, where the sounds gunfire has been heard emanating from the grounds. 5) Dan Noyes (KGO-San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose) Guardrails in California are often installed incorrectly, turning the protective barriers into potential dangers. 6) Craig Fiegener (ABC 30 Action News) Fifteen travelers are swindled by a travel agency, which sold them unconfirmed tickets for a cruise. 7) Joel Grover (CBS 2-Los Angeles) An undercover investigation reveals that valet parking attendants at LA's hottest night clubs steal from their customers. 8) Paul Gallagher (60 Minutes) An investigation of the U.S. Marine Corps' MV-22 "Osprey" aircraft reveals serious mechanical problems that contributed to two crashes in 2000, which killed 23 Marines. 60 Minutes also reports that "senior officers in the Osprey squadron had deliberately falsified maintenance records and lied about the aircraft's readiness -- in an apparent effort by the Marine Corps to win Pentagon approval for full production of the aircraft, at a projected cost to U.S. taxpayers of $41 billion." 9) Tom Martino (KDVR-Denver) An undercover investigation reveals that many beauty salons use a dangerous chemical to make fake nails. 10) (WGHP-Greensboro) An investigation reveals that construction works who built the homes in a subdivision failed to install the chimneys correctly, making them dangerous for those who live there. 11) Darcy Spears (KVBC-Las Vegas) A hearing aid center uses bait and switch tactics to take advantage of the elderly. 12) Jim Kenyon (WSTM-Syracuse, New York) Criminals in Canada involved in advance fee loan scams trick Americans out of thousands of dollars. 13) Bob Segall (WITI-Milwaukee) An undercover investigation reveals that security guards at a local county courthouse don't do a good job of stopping banned items from entering the building. 14) Karen Hensel (WISH-Indianapolis) Marian County inspectors don't always review homes under construction. 15) (WBTV-Charlotte, N.C.) Members of the Iredell-Statesville School Board use district funds to attend an education conference -- but then skip the convention and go on a vacation to Disney World, all on the taxpayer's dime. 16) Valeri Williams (WFAA-Dallas/Fort Worth) WFAA-TV follows up its 2000 IRE Awards entry with this return investigation into Fort Worth's John Peter Smith Hospital. Reporter Williams and producer Schucker continued their investigation, focusing on Dr. Lydia Grotti and her connection to suspicious and overlooked deaths in the emergency room. As a result of WFAA-TV's investigation the Texas Department of Health began conducting its own investigation and discovered additional deaths that took place in the ER. The county district attorney's office called in a special prosecutor to examine a total of eight suspicious deaths in connection with Dr. Grotti at the hospital. On Tape #2 is a short clip of Williams' work. Tape #3 features the entire series of stories she played at Show and Tell.
  • Accident Watch: What Disney Doesn't Want You to Know

    An ongoing Web reporting project collects injury/accident/ incident reports at theme parks in the United States. In a message posted on the website of Theme Park Insider editor Robert Niles reveals that there is a gap between the types of injuries that theme parks must report and those that they don't need to under the law. The unreported injuries include broken arms, sprained ankles, concussions and lacerations requiring stitches, the story reports. The online project "seeks to educate consumers about theme park safety, and provide them the information they to need to stay safe while visiting a park."
  • Digital Dilemma

    National Journal questions the increase in copyright protections as opposed to "fundamental rights as freedom of speech and of the press." The report looks at copyright practices in other countries, and finds that some of them are even more stringent than in the U.S.A. The story also examines how companies - mostly in the software business - use technology to prevent illegal activity, and to protect their products from copying. The article voices the concerns of library associations, which find that there is a gap between the price of the information and most users' ability to pay.