Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Grubb" ...

  • "Superfund Project"

    This project was reported by a group of interns at The Oklahoman who wanted to investigate the effects of toxic areas on Oklahoman residents. They revealed that the government had been trying to "stimulate activity to clean up the sites" by just transferring wastes from one place to another. It was also found that "little had been done" on several federal Superfund projects, and many were "underfunded."
  • Hope Scholarships Transform the University of Georgia: Applicants have better credentials, but grade grubbing and grade inflation are growing

    The article examined how Georgia's college scholarship program, the largest in the nation, has changed the state's flagship campus in ways that state officials would prefer to ignore. The five-year-old scholarships , which pay tuition for students who earn a minimum of a B average, have served as a model for programs in other states, as well as for President Clinton's new tax credits for higher education. The author documented how the emphasis on the B average at the university has spurred grade inflation and influenced student academic choices. Virtually all freshman receive a HOPE scholarship, so the grade pressure on students and professors is intense. Faced with data showing that HOPE recipients received much better grades than pre-HOPE students (even thought the high school credentials of the HOPE recipients were mixed), some professors admitted to inflating grades and acknowledged that the scholarship has done little to improve student quality.
  • "King David; Power and Paranoia at Baptist Hospital"

    Baptist hospital is the largest nonprofit medical center in Nashville, competing in the shadow of Columbia/HCA How does Baptist distinguish itself? Longtime chief executive, C. David Stringfield, purports to be a devout Christian who runs a caring, philanthropic and religious institution. But a three-month Nashville Scene investigation revealed a vast gap between Stringfield's public persona and his true identity. Although a capable hospital administrator, Stringfield is a bizarre personality-- paranoid nasty, ultra-competitive, womanizing and money-grubbing. Under his stewardship, Baptist and its affiliate organizations have run into a string of financial and management problems. Stringfield himself appears to have been involved in several questionable financial dealings.
  • The Medical Board of California: A controversial past, a confusing present, a brighter future?

    California Physician reports that "Since 1975, the Medical Board of California, formerly the Board of Medical Quality Assurance, has provided primary oversight for licensing and enforcement of practice standards for health professions in California. As with any regulatory body with a complex range of responsibilities, MBC's performance has been the subject of criticism over the years--most recently, a six-month investigation of MBC by the California Highway Patrol has received substantial press and raised serious questions about management practices within the Board."
  • Broken Pipeline

    KIMO-TV (Anchorage) reveals large amounts of unstable natural gas liquid were being shipped through the trans-Alaska pipeline, which was not built for that use; pipeline leaked hydrocarbons, increasing air pollution in town of Valdez; reports the Alyeska company broke promises made to Congress when it sought permission to build the pipeline, Dec. 20, 1987.