Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Hackers" ...

  • The Hacker Who Took Down a Country

    The story chronicled how one hacker took nearly a whole country offline and revealed, for the first time, how and why he did it. Our reporting showed that Daniel Kaye was a mercenary, that he’d been paid to carry out the attack by the CEO of a large African telecommunications company, who had since gone into hiding. The story gave an unprecedented insight into the world of darkweb hackers and the unscrupulous figures who hire them.
  • How to Hack An Election

    The inside story of how a cybercriminal for hire teamed with Latin's America's most notorious fixer to influence presidential elections and subvert government power across the continent for a decade. Despite a wealth of cybersecurity reporting in recent years, the ability of computer hackers to disrupt the democratic foundation of elections had gone virtually unchronicled. This Bloomberg Businessweek article not only showed it could be done, it took the reader deep inside the operations with a hacker, who put himself in danger by speaking. The ground-breaking story stunned readers, journalists and officials in several countries. And it proved to be a roadmap to the disruption of the U.S. presidential election later in the year, with Russian agents accused of using digital tools to manipulate social media and to produce fake news that influenced public opinion.
  • Not So Securus: Massive Hack of 70 Million Prisoner Phone Calls Indicates Violations of Attorney-Client Privilege

    The Intercept obtained a massive database of leaked phone records belonging to prison telecom giant Securus Technologies — accessed by an anonymous hacker and submitted to The Intercept via SecureDrop. By analyzing its contents, “Not So Securus” provided an unprecedented illustration of the sheer scale of phone surveillance of detainees within the criminal justice system, revealing how such monitoring has gone far beyond the stated goal of ensuring the security of prison facilities to compromise the privacy of inmates and their loved ones — and potentially violate the confidential communications guaranteed to prisoners and their lawyers.
  • Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Cyber Attack Reporting

    Over the past decade, hackers have stolen trade secrets, millions of personal identities, and wrought havoc on some of the world’s biggest companies. Some of these actions were orchestrated by lone criminals; some by governments. All of them share one thing in common: The details are never revealed. That changed in 2014 when Bloomberg Businessweek published a trio of deeply reported stories by Michael Riley and Bloomberg colleagues about digital attacks. Each vividly takes readers into the secretive world of hackers and exposes corporate America’s vulnerabilities in startling detail. “The Epic Hack: Target ignored its own alarms – and turned its customers into victims," "How Russian Hackers Stole the NASDAQ” and “Now at the Sands: Iranian Hackers in Every Server” exemplify superlative investigative reporting in a complex field alongside masterful storytelling.
  • The Case of the Phantom Ballots

    A grand jury report revealed Miami-Dade County had thwarted an attempt by mysterious hackers to submit more than 2,500 absentee ballot requests online during the 2012 elections without voters' knowledge. Prosecutors said they couldn't find out who did it. The Miami Herald set out to prove otherwise. Our reporting led to an investigation and a conviction in the 2012 case -- and to two additional investigations and convictions for 2013 copycats.
  • Unsafe at Any Bitrate

    Reporters used forensic technology and confidential records to track the electronic footprints of hackers, exposing major computer attacks in unprecedented, minute-by-minute detail, identifying who was behind the intrusions, how they succeeded and the damage.
  • Cyber Espionage: The Chinese Threat

    It’s the biggest threat facing American business today but the least talked about by corporate executives. Experts at the highest levels of government agree, cyber espionage is threatening to steal American wealth, American jobs and ultimately America’s economic security and the biggest aggressor is China. Due to the nature of the crime, the cost to American businesses is nearly impossible to pinpoint. Experts say Chinese hackers are constantly probing corporate networks, sifting through endless amounts of data to decipher what is valuable intellectual property, chemical formulas or proprietary technology. One conservative estimate from the National Counter Intelligence Executive puts the cost of economic espionage at up to $400B annually, but the report states such estimates vary “so widely as to be meaningless,” reflecting the scarcity of data available. CNBC’s David Faber and the Investigations Inc. team spoke with many corporate executives about China’s aggressive effort to target American businesses and their most valuable assets, but many refused to comment on camera for our report, citing becoming more vulnerable to attack by speaking publicly about the issue. However, not one executive denied their company is at risk of cyber-attack on a daily basis or the possibility of losing valuable intellectual property to cyber spies. Government and industry experts we spoke with on-camera have witnessed such costly cyber-attacks during their careers and attest to the fact there are only two companies left in America today: Those who know they’ve been hacked and those who don’t. From a whistleblower claiming telecommunications giant Nortel was one of the first casualties of this all-out cyber war, to high profile and public attacks on Google and RSA, its clear defending against cyber espionage is the new normal for American business.
  • Fatal System Error

    The book details the inner workings of the criminal internet hackers and their links to government.
  • Cyber Snooping

    Months of reporting led to this story about the growing fear of cyber espionage in the United States. For the first time the US Government admitted that an average person's communication devices are susceptible to hacking without there knowledge.
  • Hi-Tech Heist

    "60 Minutes showed how hackers easily steal customer personal and financial data from retailers, through stores' wireless systems. And while both the retail industry and the credit card companies know this is a growing problems, they are caught up in a fight as to who's to blame, and who should pay to fix it."