Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Homeland Security" ...

  • Newsweek: 2018 U.S. Military Southern Border Deployment

    An investigation into President Donald Trump's decision to deploy thousands of military troops to the southern border as a caravan of migrants travel to the U.S. in search of asylum.
  • The Intercept: Detained, then Violated

    The Intercept obtained hundreds of complaints of sexual and physical abuse in immigration detention, in response to a public records request with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General, which is tasked with independently reviewing the department’s various agencies, including ICE and Border Patrol.
  • Spies in the Skies

    America is being watched from above. Government surveillance planes, operated by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security, routinely circle over most major cities. We assembled an unprecedented picture of the operation’s scale and sweep by analyzing more than 4 months of aircraft tracking data for about 200 federal aircraft.
  • Missing Airport ID’s

    This investigation revealed hundreds of airport ID’s have been lost or stolen at some of the nation’s busiest airports. Some missing badges were not deactivated for days or weeks because employees or companies failed to notify airport police. Those badges allow workers to bypass security screening and access the most secure areas unchecked. As a result of our reports, a bi-partisan group of U.S. Senators has introduced a bill that directs the TSA to increase fines for airports, airport workers and employers who fail to report badges lost or stolen right away. And it requires all large U.S. airports to notify Congress if more than 3% of an airport’s ID’s are missing. Our reporting also prompted the Department of Homeland Security Inspector General to launch an ongoing review of lost and stolen ID’s. Our team produced and reported the story for NBC Nightly News and the TODAY Show, bringing our findings to a national audience.
  • Homeland Insecurity

    Dozens of U.S. border agents have been caught in recent years illegally smuggling weapons, drugs, or people into the United States. Melissa del Bosque and Patrick Michels investigate why so few of them have been disciplined or punished. In their mindboggling tale of broken accountability at the Department of Homeland Security, Michels and del Bosque find that a broken chain of command, turf wars, grueling caseloads, and a lack of internal accountability at the DHS Office of Inspector General have allowed potentially corrupt agents to remain employed for years on our nation's border with Mexico.
  • PSTA-Driving Outside the Lines

    An Investigation into the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority showing it knowingly created an illegal plan to use a $354,000 Homeland Security Grant to promote a tax increase. As we got deeper into looking at the agency we found maintenance problems the agency tried to cover up and lie about and drivers on the road who should not have been behind the wheel
  • Stop and Seize: Cops and the Cash They Confiscate

    After Sept. 11, 2001, federal authorities asked local and state police to serve as their eyes and ears on America's highways. The departments of Justice and Homeland Security, along with state agencies, spent millions to train them in an aggressive technique known as highway interdiction. But it soon became something else: Dragnets that swept up the criminal and innocent alike in a search for money. The Washington Post series revealed one of the great unknown consequences of 9/11. Local and state police, working through a Justice program called Equitable Sharing, have made nearly 62,000 cash seizures totally $2.5 billion since 9/11, without warrants or criminal charges.
  • Immigration

    After the Homeland Security Department announced that several hundred immigrants had been released from immigration jails due to budget cuts, Associated Press reporter Alicia A. Caldwell exclusively revealed that the U.S. government actually had released more than 2,000 of them. The White House and Homeland Security Secretary disputed AP’s reporting for weeks before the Obama administration, under oath, conceded that AP had been correct all along.
  • City cancels plans for Super Bowl drone despite enthusiasm and interest from NOPD, others

    After The Lens began asking questions about New Orleans' plans to use a U.S. Homeland Security Department aerial drone to monitor Super Bowl crowds, a spokesman for Mayor Mitch Landrieu announced that the city is scrapping those plans. The policy change contrasted with the city’s recent efforts to acquire an unmanned aerial vehicle.
  • Secret Service Strip Club: El Salvador

    Seattle-based investigative reporter Chris Halsne tracks down a reluctant source in El Salvador to expose allegations that getting drunk, partying with strippers, and paying for sex with third-world prostitutes is part of the U.S. Secret Service culture. This investigative series is aired just weeks after agents were caught in Columbia with hookers – and just days after Homeland Security Director announced to Congress that Columbia was an isolated incident.