Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Huffington Post" ...

  • A Forgotten Crisis

    Melissa, Tara and Amanda interviewed dozens of military spouses, across every branch, all over the country. Then they cross-referenced their stories to identify the biggest problems and gaps in the system. Finally, they tracked down domestic violence experts, military leaders and others to add critical context and comment. It took over a year to report. The result was five articles that dug into the challenges faced by domestic violence victims in the military: a structure that favors the abuser in which commanders determine if a crime has been committed, a family advocacy program that, in some instances, upholds outdated beliefs about gender roles, and a lack of support for victims who face enormous financial consequences if they choose to leave their partners. HuffPost’s investigation found that service members are rarely investigated or punished for acts of domestic violence. Because of this lack of accountability, many victims we interviewed are still afraid of their former partners. Some have been unable to get protective orders because there is no official record of their partner’s abuse, as paperwork does not travel seamlessly from the military world to the civilian one.
  • Twice Abandoned: How schools and child-welfare systems fail kids in foster care

    Foster kids graduate high school and go to college at a much lower rate than other groups of children. The federal government is trying to help these young people from falling behind, but many states aren’t doing their part. We look at how schools and child-welfare systems are each failing the foster youth in their care.
  • Evicted and Abandoned: The World Bank’s Broken Promise to the Poor

    Evicted and Abandoned is a global investigation that reveals how the World Bank Group, the powerful development lender committed to ending poverty, has regularly failed to follow its own rules for protecting vulnerable populations. The Center for Public Integrity’s International Consortium of Investigative Journalists teamed with the Huffington Post, the GroundTruth Project, the Investigative Fund, the Guardian and more than 20 other news organizations to develop this series of stories. In all, more than 80 journalists from 21 countries worked together to document the bank’s lapses and show their consequences for people around the globe. The reporting team traveled to affected communities in more than a dozen countries – including indigenous hamlets in the Peruvian Andes, fishing settlements along India’s northwest coast and a war-scarred village in Kosovo’s coal-mining belt. http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/projects/worldbank-evicted-abandoned
  • Deficient Hospices Rarely Punished

    After mining a database of inspection records, Huffington Post determined that hospices frequently go three years -- and sometimes much longer -- without any regulatory scrutiny. It also showed that when hospices break Medicare's rules, endangering the safety and even lives of their frail patients, they are virtually never punished. Medicare’s regulator has punished a hospice provider just 16 times in the last decade, despite carrying out 15,000 inspections and identifying more than 31,000 violations. In each instance, the hospice’s license was terminated -- the sole recourse for regulators when they confront a hospice that breaks the rules. The system of oversight designed to ensure sound practices in an industry that has quadrupled in size since 2000 simply has no means to assess fines or other punishments. The service, which at its best provides a caring, home-based alternative to hospitalization for terminally ill patients, is increasingly how Americans die. Yet virtually nothing is known about the quality of the companies providing that service. This story reveals to consumers those hospices that regulators have determined have the most problems -- and hopefully spurring government authorities to act.
  • Why Did The Washington Post Name The White House Volunteer Accused In Prostitution Scandal?

    The Washington Post broke several details about the United States Secret Service this year and received high praise. But The Washington Post's explosive Oct. 8 allegations about a former White House volunteer soliciting a prostitute during a 2012 trip to Cartagena, and unsubstantiated claims of a White House cover-up, deserved scrutiny. The Huffington Post looked deeply at the alleged "evidence" and published private correspondence between editors and attorneys to show that much of what was promoted as new information on Oct. 8 had been rebutted more than seven months earlier. It was later revealed that a key source for the The Post had prostitution allegations against himself, raising more questions about the paper's decision to publish such potentially damaging claims.
  • Inside the Global Black Market for Stolen iPhones

    Gerry Smith's four-part Huffington Post series exploring the global underground trade in stolen smartphones.
  • Pay For The Triggerman: NBC 5 Investigates the Army’s Treatment of the Fort Hood Shooter and His Victims.

    Just hours after we aired the first story in this series it was flashed across the globe by news sites from the Huffington Post, to the Washington Times, and the London Daily Mail. In a matter of days several Congressmen worked to address what NBC 5 Investigates first reported: Major Nidal Hasan the man who shot and killed 13 U.S. soldiers and wounded another 32 at Fort Hood was still on the Army payroll and had received nearly $300,000 from U.S. taxpayers since his arrest. That did not sit well with victims of the attack still struggling to recover financially and emotionally. The Army had denied the victims pay and benefits awarded to other soldiers wounded at U.S. military bases overseas and in the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon. Over the next seven months our coverage continued in-depth over a series of eleven reports uncovering never-before-reported details about the Army’s treatment of the gunman and the victims. V.I.P. style helicopter rides for Hasan to help him work on his defense, his own private office created at Fort Hood, and millions spent on trial preparations during a process that dragged on for nearly four years.
  • "The New Tax Man"

    This series of stories by the Huffington Post Investigative Fund examines how tough financial times have affected "ordinary" citizens. Reporters revealed how local property tax collectors were "selling the right to collect unpaid taxes to private investors," which could leave homeowners with large extra fees, and the possibility of losing "their home if they are unable to pay."
  • "Cash Committee"

    In this story, Huffington Post reporters show the "revolving door" between Congress and "industry," and how both use the House Financial Services Committee to raise money for lawmakers, especially in the private sector.
  • "Under Attack, Credit Raters Turn to the First Amendment"

    Credit rating agencies claim they are protected by the First Amendment right of free speech and therefore cannot be held accountable for their mistakes. Huffington Post Investigative Fund reporters looked deeply into credit raters' claims and found a "potential crack" in their argument.