Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ISIS" ...

  • Surviving the Drought: We Investigate California’s Water Crisis

    We investigated California's drought to find out why a state that leads the world in innovation, technology, science and progressive policy can't seem to figure out how to solve a water crisis when other countries around the world can. We asked a simple question: if other countries can do it why can't California? And our months of investigation and interviews with more than 75 scientists, policy makers, innovators, designers, engineers and venture capitalists revealed that the problem of record drought in California isn't as much about lack of rain and snow but about lack of vision and stalemate because of entrenched and intractable policy and history. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwT_GMRuEik http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Surviving-the-Drought-Investigate-California-Water-Crisis-338921102.html
  • Coming to America

    From the U.S. to Europe, amid a global struggle with a humanitarian and security crisis, our series focused on the nexus between immigration, terrorism and refugees.
  • Journey to Jihad

    This is a nine-thousand-word investigation into the European jihadi pipeline. Using thousands of pages of leaked Belgian Federal Police records, which included wiretaps, electronic surveillance, seized radicalization pamphlets, and interrogation transcripts, it traces the web of connections between jihadi recruiters in Europe, and follows a reluctant ISIS member to Syria and back. It also reveals previously-unknown details on Amr al-Absi, the Syrian emir identified by the U.S. State Department as having been "in charge of kidnappings" for ISIS, as well war crimes committed against local civilians by his European recruits. I also took a portrait of the main subject, and a separate portrait of his father. Both pictures were published in the magazine. The article was my M.A. thesis project at Columbia Journalism School.
  • Undrinkable

    Imagine if you turned on the tap and the water that poured out was undrinkable. That's the reality facing an estimated 100,000 Texans — many of them impoverished Latinos living along the Mexican border. The Texas Tribune exposed this public health crisis in a five-part series in March — a crucial reporting project that revealed the malfeasance, red tape, environmental woes, political infighting and cultural barriers that stood in the way of getting clean, safe water to the neediest parts of the state.
  • ACLU of Michigan: Flint Water Crisis

    This nomination is made by Kary Moss, Executive Director of the ACLU of Michigan, for work performed by the ACLU of Michigan’s Investigative Reporter, Curt Guyette. Curt’s work was pivotal in exposing the disastrous results of the State of Michigan’s decision to take the City of Flint off of the Detroit Water system and instead use the Flint River. At the time, the City was under the control of state-appointed emergency managers who had made the decision to switch the source of the City’s water as a cost-cutting measure. Two years ago the ACLU of Michigan created a new position of investigative report to examine and report on the repercussions of the State of Michigan’s use of a law that allowed it put an emergency manager in control of the city’s finances, divesting locally elected authorities of their powers. ACLU of Michigan legal staff provided additional help in filing Freedom of Information Act requests and helping Curt gain access to State of Michigan press briefings.
  • The Lost Bank

    "The Lost Bank" deals with the issue of the 2007-2008 financial crisis and how the bank failed to prevent an economic recession.
  • Fatal shooting exposes nepotism in the California Senate

    The California Capitol was rocked last year by criminal charges against three state senators accused in unrelated cases of bribery, perjury and conspiracy to traffic weapons. These were high-profile cases that garnered widespread media attention and public hand-wringing by politicians. What wasn't being covered by anyone else was the stories you will read here, about an ethical crisis simmering in the administrative side of the state Senate -- problems that had been largely ignored by the politicians elected to run the house. This entry includes 11 news stories I wrote over six months, a mix of enterprise investigations and breaking news. Rosenhall coverage led to significant changes in the administration of the California Senate.
  • Home Care Crisis

    The Columbus Dispatch examined Ohio’s preparedness for the shift to in-home care, which is rapidly replacing nursing homes and institutions as the preferred form of long-term care. They documented the industry’s tremendous, almost unchecked, growth in central Ohio, and showed how fraud, low wages and scant regulation jeopardize care and waste public health funds.
  • Surviving an ISIS Massacre

    ISIS massacred hundreds of Iraqi military recruits in June. Ali Hussein Kadhim survived. This is his improbable story. [Includes graphic images.]
  • European Jihadists

    As the world's attention turned to ISIS advancing from their staging ground in Syria through to Iraq, CNN International correspondent Atika Shubert and her team focused on the phenomenon of European jihadists joining their ranks. They are primarily young Muslims, who are drawn to fight in Syria -- often leaving solid middle-class homes and relatively comfortable lives to participate in “jihad” – holy war, alongside members of ISIS, al Qaeda and other groups. It is a phenomenon that keeps western intelligence agents up at night, and as this description is being written, Atika is in Paris reporting for CNN while French authorities are on a massive man-hunt for terrorists who may have done just that – gone to fight in Syria and come back to bring their extreme beliefs and its attendant violence back home. Through their reporting, Atika and her team have tried to understand the phenomenon – even interviewing British jihadists in Idlib, Syria via Skype to find out why they are there.