Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ISIS" ...

  • This Is How ISIS Smuggles Oil

    This piece is an exclusive ground-level look at the illicit oil trade that has made ISIS the world’s richest extremist group, reported by BuzzFeed News’ Mike Giglio from the Turkey-Syria border. It includes exclusive photos and video leaked from the smugglers themselves.
  • Florida’s Foreclosure Crisis

    Florida homeowners are being steamrolled through foreclosure courts by overzealous judges, while others are left holding the bag for abandoned and unlivable homes, because state officials have placed expedience over the right to due process in an effort to clear a perceived backlog in court cases. The Center for Public Integrity interviewed dozens of homeowners, lawyers, judges and public officials, observed courtrooms, and examined databases and documents to paint a picture of a foreclosure crisis that persists years after the financial crisis. The project resulted in Wells Fargo, one of the biggest mortgage lenders, rehabbing dozens of abandoned homes it owns, and state officials looking at ways to make the state courts more responsive to the needs of homeowners.
  • Pension Crisis

    Jacksonville’s Police and Fire Pension Fund is in crisis. The fund has about 43 cents available for every dollar promised to its retired police officers and fire fighters. Now $2.88 billion, the multiplying city debt is threatening the city’s financial stability. Bond ratings have been downgraded. City projects have been scuttled. Bankruptcy is feared. The recent recession isn’t the only thing that crippled the fund. Deals done in secret, deals hidden for more than a decade and sweetheart deals that allowed a select few to skirt regulations and retire from public service jobs with hundreds of thousands of extra dollars they weren’t entitled to are also to blame.
  • Inside the New York Fed

    A confidential report and a fired examiner’s hidden recorder penetrate the cloistered world of Wall Street’s top regulator — and its history of deference to some of the country’s biggest banks.
  • ISIS Media Campaign

    This piece was the first to take a hard look at the ISIS Media Campaign and how the terrorist organization was using sophisticated tools and savvy social media to recruit, terrorize and spread their propaganda. CBS News drew attention to their "mujatweets" -- high def videos that use Western jihadis to recruit other Westerners, as well as previously unreported Media booths in ISIS controlled areas where people can go in and download ISIS material.
  • Fear at FSU

    These stories exposed the utter failure of a state’s mental health system to aid a sick man who was in crisis and begging for help -- and showed that the cost of that failure was a shooting spree at a major American university. They raised questions about the handling of the shooter's case in New Mexico, stoked a national conversation about the availability of quality mental health care for people in need and spurred a proposal to reform New Mexico state law.
  • Fixed Fortunes

    In the era of billion-dollar presidential campaigns and political groups that can raise donations in unlimited amounts from almost any source, we are used to reading stories about the large amounts of money that special interests invest in politics. But what do they get out of the government they spend so much trying to influence by supporting political campaigns and parties or hiring well-connected lobbyists? Bill Allison and Sarah Harkins set out to answer that question, compiling huge amounts of data from multiple federal sources, identifying the biggest corporate political donors over a six year period, and then compiling numbers on the various federal support -- contracts, grants, loans, loan guarantees and various programs adopted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis -- to attempt to show what the biggest donors get from the federal government.
  • Ebola Crisis: Unprepared in Dallas

    For months in the summer of 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had warned the country’s health-care community that an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Western Africa could make its way here. The feds assured the public that America’s modern medical resources and infrastructure could avert a crisis. We were told hospitals had prepared and trained their staffs, using CDC guidelines, to address a virus they had never seen. Yet in late September, when a Liberian man named Thomas Eric Duncan walked into a Dallas emergency room with fever, headache and abdominal pains, his doctor and nurses found him unremarkable – just another of the night’s many victims of mishap and contagion. He was sent away after a few hours with antibiotics. None of the caregivers realized the encounter would soon become part of U.S. medical history.
  • The Cost of Troubled Minds

    The Cost of Troubled Minds uncovers a crisis involving the treatment of the mentally ill in Texas. Investigative reporter Andy Pierrotti traveled thousands of miles across Texas and neighboring states to conduct interviews, speak to experts and review government documents. The investigation shows the state’s lack of resources, outdated facilities and a shortage of mental health care professionals ultimately cost taxpayers millions of dollars. The stories show how the problem puts a vulnerable population at risk, as told through the people and families impacted by untreated mental illness. A week following the investigation, a state report confirmed our findings and recommended overhauling the agency responsible for treating the mentally ill. In response to our investigations, a state senator filed legislation to help address shortages of mental health professionals in Texas.
  • The PTSD Crisis That's Being Ignored

    The series highlights the dramatic rates of untreated PTSD in inner-city neighborhoods in two ways: through the struggles of trauma surgeons to get proper PTSD care for their civilian patients, and through the story of an Oakland mother and her daughter who dealt with post-traumatic stress after a shooting.