Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ISIS" ...

  • Children in Danger/Foster Care Crisis

    Boston Herald's months-long investigation into the foster care system in Massachusetts, uncovering disturbing cases of abuse swept under the rug, hundreds of convicts living in foster homes and unlicensed social workers — among other findings — in a series that gained widespread attention and became one of the centerpieces of debate ahead of November's gubernatorial election.
  • VA Scandal

    Reporter Dennis Wagner, with the help of whistle blowers and veterans, exposed bureaucratic inertia at the Veterans Affairs' hospitals, dishonest scheduling practices and institutional ambivalence, forcing resignations, firings and major national reform. Throughout the crisis, and as other reporters joined Wagner, The Republic published more than 100 stories, including groundbreaking investigative stories that advanced an understanding of the kind of abuses taking place in Phoenix.
  • Betrayed by Silence

    This yearlong MPR News investigation revealed that, despite decades of assurances that the Catholic Church was safe, leaders of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis had continued to cover up abuse of children by priests. In a series of multiplatform presentations – including radio reports, an hour-long radio documentary, a four-chapter Web story and an online database of accused priests – we revealed the scope of the abuse crisis and the financial decisions by leaders of the Twin Cities archdiocese that protected priests and kept victims quiet.
  • West Virginia Water Crisis

    On Jan. 9, 2014, a chemical tank at Freedom Industries leaked on the Elk River, just north of the drinking water intake that serves 300,000 people in Charleston, the West Virginia state capital, and surrounding communities. Residents and businesses were ordered not to drink, bathe in or cook with tap water, a warning that remained in place for up to a week. Stories examined the lack of environmental enforcement, inadequate information about the toxic chemicals involved, and poorly planned water quality sampling that was used to decide when the water was again safe to use.
  • Stop The Mold

    Reporters from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism's NYCity News Service worked with the New York Daily News on a series of stories chronicling the city's losing battle to rid public housing of mold and detailing the related health and financial tolls extracted by the crisis.
  • Spies versus Congress: A Constitutional Crisis over Torture

    McClatchy’s reporting first exposed and then detailed multiple efforts by the CIA and White House to thwart the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into the agency’s use of torture, including CIA intrusions into the committee’s computers, in the most serious clash over congressional oversight of intelligence operations in decades. Other McClatchy reporting revealed the startling, top-secret conclusions of the committee's five-year, $40 million investigation eight months before the public release of the report's declassified executive summary.
  • CRISIS AT THE VA

    CNN’s year-long investigation into delays in care at Veteran Affairs hospitals exposed a widespread national crisis within the United States Veterans Affairs healthcare system; eventually leading to the resignation of VA Secretary Eric Shinseki, the passage of federal legislation, and a fundamental change in how veterans’ medical appointments are made, recorded and reported. Today tens of thousands of veterans who were lost in the appointment system are already getting more timely care, because of the work of Senior Investigative Correspondent Drew Griffin and the CNN Investigations team.
  • Failure to Recall: Investigating GM

    In this hour-long documentary CNBC investigated a deepening crisis at one of America's most iconic companies. Following the dark days of bankruptcy, General Motors fought its way back to health only to confront evidence of a deadly manufacturing defect and accusations of a corporate cover-up. After linking thirteen deaths and 31 accidents to a faulty ignition switch, the company recalled some 2.6 million cars. But as GM undertook the massive recall, questions mounted over why it hadn't acted sooner to inform the public about the flawed part.
  • Water's Edge--The crisis of rising sea levels

    Few subjects in the news stir as much controversy as climate change. In the U.S., the threat of rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the contribution of human activity to that threat, and even whether the climate is changing at all are fiercely debated and politically polarizing. Inconclusive science only further polarizes the issue. Lost in all the vitriol is one aspect of a changing environment that is not debatable: rising seas. Tidal waters worldwide have climbed an average of 8 inches over the past century. Yet the volume of journalism documenting rising seas as an immediate, observable phenomenon has been scant; more typically, news media have relied on extrapolations and predictions to create frightening scenarios far in the future. Reuters set out to change that in its series “Water’s Edge: the Crisis of Rising Sea Levels.” For this yearlong project, Reuters did its own science. We collected and analyzed vast stores of hard data and combined the results with on-the-ground reporting to produce stories unique in their treatment of rising seas not as a future threat, but as a troubling reality for millions of people living along the U.S. coast.
  • The Untouchables

    In the aftermath of the financial crisis, Americans demanded to know why no Wall Street banks or senior executives had faced criminal charges. Critics questioned whether, in the midst of a painful recovery, Wall Street was simply “too big to jail.” With the five-year statute of limitations approaching, FRONTLINE producer Martin Smith sought answers to these questions in the film The Untouchables: an investigation into whether the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) failed to act on evidence that Wall Street knowingly originated, packaged and sold toxic home loans that poisoned the global economy.